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Presence of multiple abnormal immunologic markers is an independent prognostic factor of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

  • Yiwen Cao
  • Zhenhua Liu
  • Wen Wu
  • Ying Qian
  • Qin Shi
  • Rong Shen
  • Binshen Ouyang
  • Pengpeng Xu
  • Shu Cheng
  • Jin Ye
  • Yiming Lu
  • Chaofu Wang
  • Chengde Yang
  • Li WangEmail author
  • Weili ZhaoEmail author
Open Access
Research Article

Abstract

Autoimmune diseases (ADs) increase the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and contribute to poor prognosis of patients. However, the association between immunologic markers and clinical outcome has rarely been investigated. This study aims to analyze the prognostic value of pretreatment immunologic markers in newly diagnosed patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We retrospectively reviewed the data on 502 patients with DLBCL treated in our institution from January 2013 to March 2018. Survival functions were estimated using Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression model. The 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 70.2% and 80.9%, respectively, and the complete remission (CR) rate was 78.1%. Among the patients, those with multiple ( ≥ 3) abnormal immunologic markers had significantly shorter 3-year PFS (52.7% vs. 77.3%, P < 0.001) and OS (68.5% vs. 85.8%, P = 0.001) than those without multiple abnormal immunologic markers. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of multiple abnormal immunologic markers and the elevated serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase were the independent adverse prognostic factors for PFS (P = 0.008, P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.003, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, advanced Ann Arbor stage was an independent adverse prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.001) and age > 60 years for OS (P = 0.014). In conclusion, the immunologic status was closely related to lymphoma progression, and this study provides new insights into the risk stratification of patients with DLBCL.

Keywords

immunologic marker diffuse large B-cell lymphoma prognosis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study is supported, in part, by research funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81520108003, 81670716, and 81830007), Chang Jiang Scholars Program, the Shanghai Commission of Science and Technology (No. 16JC1405800), Shanghai Municipal Education Commission Gaofeng Clinical Medicine Grant Support (Nos. 20152206 and 20152208), Clinical Research Plan of SHDC (No. 16CR2017A), Multicenter Clinical Research Project by Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (No. DLY201601), Collaborative Innovation Center of Systems Biomedicine and the SamuelWaxman Cancer Research Foundation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the appropriate credit is given to the original author(s) and the source, and a link is provided to the Creative Commons license, indicating if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yiwen Cao
    • 1
  • Zhenhua Liu
    • 2
  • Wen Wu
    • 1
  • Ying Qian
    • 1
  • Qin Shi
    • 1
  • Rong Shen
    • 1
  • Binshen Ouyang
    • 3
  • Pengpeng Xu
    • 1
  • Shu Cheng
    • 1
  • Jin Ye
    • 4
  • Yiming Lu
    • 4
  • Chaofu Wang
    • 3
  • Chengde Yang
    • 5
  • Li Wang
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Weili Zhao
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Institute of HematologyRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of UltrasonographyRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of PathologyRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Pôle de Recherches Sino-Français en Science du Vivant et GénomiqueRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  5. 5.Department of RheumatologyRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina

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