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Mechanical properties, components and decay resistance of Populus davidiana bioincised by Coriolus versicolor

  • Lulu Chang
  • Binbin Rong
  • Guoqi XuEmail author
  • Qingkai Meng
  • Lihai WangEmail author
Original Paper
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Abstract

The experiment was conducted to improve the decay resistance of wood by increasing the wood preservatives uptake and penetration depth by bioincising with Coriolus versicolor. The mechanical properties of bioincised Populus davidiana sapwood were measured. The changes of wood components (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose) were analyzed by FTIR. The staining treatment using potassium permanganate was to measure the preservatives uptake and penetration depth in wood specimens. The decay resistance of bioincised specimens impregnated with IPBC and CA was assessed against C. versicolor and Gloeophyllum trabeum using bioincised P. davidiana sapwood and untreated controls. The results showed that the mechanical properties of the bioincised specimens were changed with the incubation time and mass loss. The mechanical strength was decreased after 17 days compared to that of the specimens bioincised < 13 days. The bioincised specimens demonstrated the deeper penetration depth than the un-bioincised specimens. It was significant correlation (P < 0.01) between penetration depth and incubation time. The average value of the penetration depth of the bioincised specimens was deeper than the control groups by 158.7%. By FTIR analysis, the biodegradation ability of C. versicolor to decay cellulose and hemicellulose was weaker than that of lignin. The bioincising treatment significantly increased the wood uptake of IPBC and CA, and reached the maximum uptake value at 17 and 13 days, respectively. Summarily, the bioincising pretreatment can obviously improve the wood decay resistance against C. versicolor and G. trabeum following by introducing the IPBC and CA.

Keywords

Wood bioincising pretreated FTIR Wood preservative Permeability 

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Engineering and TechnologyNortheast Forestry UniversityHarbinPeople’s Republic of China

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