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Trends in Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes-Related Complications, 1997–2017

  • Tommy Chiou
  • Yusuke Tsugawa
  • Dana Goldman
  • Rebecca Myerson
  • Matthew Kahn
  • John A. RomleyEmail author
Concise Research Report
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INTRODUCTION

The rate of diabetes-related complications among Americans with diabetes has declined significantly over the past two decades.1 However, it remains unclear how complication rates have changed across different racial/ethnic groups, as past studies on diabetes complication disparities are either outdated, restricted to limited populations, did not examine trends, or included only limited race/ethnicity categories.1, 2, 3, 4 Therefore, we used nationally representative data to examine prevalence trends in several diabetes complications from 1997 to 2017 among Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in the USA.

METHODS

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) from 1997 to 2017 was used to identify non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Hispanic adults aged 20 years or older with self-reported diagnoses of diabetes mellitus (type 1 or 2). The two outcomes of interest were (1) a cardiovascular complication composite defined as patients experiencing either coronary heart disease,...

Notes

Author Contribution

Chiou contributed to the design of the study, conducted the data analyses, led the interpretation of the data and drafting and revisions of the article, and takes full responsibility for the contents of the article. Tsugawa contributed to the design of the study, interpretation of the data, and the revisions of the article for important intellectual content. Goldman, Myerson, and Kahn contributed to the conceptualization and design of the study, as well as the interpretation of the data. Romley led the conceptualization and design of the study, and contributed to the interpretation of the data and revisions of the article for important intellectual content.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

This study was approved by an institutional review board at University of Southern California.

Conflict of Interest

Goldman is a consultant to Precision Health Economics, a healthcare consultancy providing services to the life sciences industry, and owns equity (< 1%) in its parent company, Precision Medicine Group. Myerson reports grant funding from Bristol-Myers Squibb for investigator-initiated research. Romley is a consultant to Precision Health Economics. Chiou, Tsugawa, and Kahn report nothing to disclose. These relationships did not impact the design, execution, or interpretation of this study.

References

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tommy Chiou
    • 1
  • Yusuke Tsugawa
    • 2
  • Dana Goldman
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Rebecca Myerson
    • 1
    • 4
  • Matthew Kahn
    • 5
  • John A. Romley
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & EconomicsLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Price School of Public PolicyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.School of PharmacyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of EconomicsUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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