Advertisement

The Yield of Birth Cohort Screening for Hepatitis C in Community Health Centers

  • Sarah E. RowanEmail author
  • Larissa Muething
  • Kirsten Spielmann
  • Joshua Blum
  • Yingbo Lou
  • Shawni Vaughn
  • William J. Burman
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released recommendations to screen all individuals born 1945–1965 for hepatitis C (HCV), regardless of risk factors.1 In response to this recommendation and in anticipation of a new generation of effective and well-tolerated HCV medications, we implemented a screening program in two urban community health centers (CHCs). The objective was to identify individuals living with previously undiagnosed HCV and to facilitate linkage-to-care.

METHODS

This study took place at two CHCs in Denver, CO. Participants were born between 1945 and 1965, were attending routine primary care appointments, and had never been fully screened for HCV. We included individuals who had prior positive HCV antibody tests but no follow-up RNA testing. Navigators approached individuals while they were waiting for their providers and offered to order HCV testing. The navigator followed up all tests and provided counseling and linkage support. We...

Notes

Contributors

The clinical staff at the two participating CHCs, the patients, and the HCV navigators all contributed to this work.

Funding

This work was funded by CDC PPHF 1U51PS003805-0 through the CDC’s Hep TLC initiative.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Rowan receives salary support through research grants from Gilead Sciences, Inc. All remaining authors declare they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Smith BD, Morgan RL, Beckett GA, et al. Recommendations for the identification of chronic hepatitis C virus infection among persons born during 1945–1965. MMWR Recommendations and reports: Morbidity and mortality weekly report Recommendations and reports/Centers for Disease Control. 2012;61(RR-4):1–32.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Patel RC, Vellozzi C, Smith BD. Results of Hepatitis C Birth-Cohort Testing and Linkage to Care in Selected U.S. Sites, 2012-2014. Public Health Rep. 2016;131 Suppl 2:12–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Coyle C, Viner K, Hughes E, et al. Identification and Linkage to Care of HCV-Infected Persons in Five Health Centers - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2012-2014. MMWR Morbidity and mortality weekly report. 2015;64(17):459–463.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cornett JK, Bodiwala V, Razuk V, Shukla D, Narayanan N. Results of a Hepatitis C Virus Screening Program of the 1945–1965 Birth Cohort in a Large Emergency Department in New Jersey. Open forum infectious diseases. 2018;5(4):ofy065.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Moyer VA, Force USPST. Screening for hepatitis C virus infection in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Annals of internal medicine. 2013;159(5):349–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ly KN, Hughes EM, Jiles RB, Holmberg SD. Rising Mortality Associated With Hepatitis C Virus in the United States, 2003-2013. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2016;62(10):1287–1288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah E. Rowan
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Larissa Muething
    • 2
  • Kirsten Spielmann
    • 1
  • Joshua Blum
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yingbo Lou
    • 1
  • Shawni Vaughn
    • 1
  • William J. Burman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Denver Health and Hospital AuthorityDenverUSA
  2. 2.University of Colorado DenverAuroraUSA

Personalised recommendations