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E-cigarette Use Is Associated with Non-prescribed Medication Use in Adults: Results from the PATH Survey

  • Kathryn Bentivegna
  • Nkiruka C. Atuegwu
  • Cheryl Oncken
  • Erin L. Mead
  • Mario F. Perez
  • Eric M. MortensenEmail author
Concise Research Reports
  • 10 Downloads

INTRODUCTION

Electronic cigarettes (“e-cigs”) are devices designed to simulate smoking cigarettes by heating a liquid that usually contains glycerine, propylene glycol, flavors, and nicotine, a behavior commonly known as “vaping.”1 E-cig use has significantly increased in popularity during the last decade, particularly among adolescents and young adults.2 Although they have been promoted as a safer alternative to smoking conventional cigarettes, e-cigs are not without harm,1 and additionally, recent reports suggest that e-cigs could also be used as illicit drug delivery systems.3 This is highly relevant as e-cig users have reported other high-risk behavior when compared with subjects who do not use them, including alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use.4, 5

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between e-cig use and a participant’s report of non-prescription use of controlled prescription medications, including1 pain killers, sedatives or tranquilizers, and/or2the...

Notes

Funding

Dr. Cheryl Oncken receives support from the NIH grants R01CA207491 and R01HD069314. She has also received clinical trial support from Pfizer pharmaceuticals.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Mortensen has consulted, and provided expert testimony, for Paratek Pharmaceuticals. All remaining authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

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    Mirbolouk M, Charkhchi P, Kianoush S, et al. Prevalence and distribution of e-cigarette use among u.s. adults: Behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 2016. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2018;169(7):429–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Varlet V. Drug Vaping: From the Dangers of Misuse to New Therapeuitic Devices. Toxics 2016; 4(4):29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Cohn A, Villanti A, Richardson A, et al. The association between alcohol, marijuana use, and new and emerging tobacco products in a young adult population. Addict Behav. 2015;48:79–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Saddleson ML, Kozlowski LT, Giovino GA, et al. Risky behaviors, e-cigarette use and susceptibility of use among college students. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015;149:25–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Hyland A, Ambrose BK, Conway KP, et al. Design and methods of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Tobacco Control. 2017;26(4):371–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn Bentivegna
    • 1
  • Nkiruka C. Atuegwu
    • 1
  • Cheryl Oncken
    • 1
  • Erin L. Mead
    • 1
  • Mario F. Perez
    • 1
  • Eric M. Mortensen
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.University of Connecticut Medical CenterFarmingtonUSA

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