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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 176–178 | Cite as

Impact of Industry Payments on Prescribing Patterns for Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors Among Medicare Beneficiaries

  • Partik Singh
  • Howard Forman
  • Adewole S. Adamson
  • Arash Mostaghimi
  • Alexis R. Ogdie
  • Arman Oganisian
  • John S. BarbieriEmail author
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

Industry payments (including in-kind) to physicians in the form of attendance of industry sponsored continuing medical education, gifts, and meals are associated with increased rates of prescription of higher-cost, branded medications.1, 2, 3, 4 Whether industry payments are associated with preferential prescribing within a single class of brand medications is uncertain. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the association between industry payments and prescribing patterns for the branded tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors etanercept and adalimumab, which are in the same therapeutic class and have similar clinical indications.

METHODS

Data for providers in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Part D public use file who prescribed either etanercept or adalimumab in 2015 were linked with Physician Compare data and Open Payments data from 2014 and 2015, using a unique identifier of provider name and city. Payments from the manufacturers of...

Notes

Contributors

None.

Funding

Dr. Barbieri is supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award number T32-AR-007465 and receives partial salary support through a Pfizer Fellowship grant to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Alexis Ogdie has received consulting payments from AbbVie, Amgen, BMS, Corrona, Lilly, Novartis, Pfizer, and Takeda and has received grants from Novartis and Pfizer. The authors have no other conflicts of interest to disclose.

References

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    Hughes E. The Opioid that Made a Fortune for Its Maker — and for Its Prescribers. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/05/02/magazine/money-issue-insys-opioids-kickbacks.html, https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/05/02/magazine/money-issue-insys-opioids-kickbacks.html. Published May 2, 2018. Accessed August 28, 2018.

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Partik Singh
    • 1
  • Howard Forman
    • 2
  • Adewole S. Adamson
    • 3
  • Arash Mostaghimi
    • 4
  • Alexis R. Ogdie
    • 5
  • Arman Oganisian
    • 6
  • John S. Barbieri
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Feinberg School of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, School of Medicine; Yale School of Public Health; Yale School of ManagementYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Internal MedicineDell Medical School at The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  4. 4.Department of DermatologyBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of RheumatologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.Division of BiostatisticsUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Dermatology University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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