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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 184–186 | Cite as

Preferences for Physician Roles in Follow-up Care During Survivorship: Do Patients, Primary Care Providers, and Oncologists Agree?

  • Archana RadhakrishnanEmail author
  • M. Chandler McLeod
  • Ann S. Hamilton
  • Kevin C. Ward
  • Steven J. Katz
  • Sarah T. Hawley
  • Lauren P. Wallner
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

National organizations recommend team-based care, where cancer specialists and primary care providers (PCPs) work together to provide coordinated care to patients after completing cancer treatment (i.e., during survivorship).1, 2 This includes services such as managing comorbidities, performing routine health maintenance, primary cancer surveillance and secondary cancer screening. The adoption of team-based care models has lagged, in part, due to uncertainty around whether the oncologist or PCP should manage these services.3 Prior studies reported that while 51% of PCPs support a shared-care model, nearly 60% of oncologists prefer that oncologists direct this care. Our work shows that a notable minority of women with early-stage breast cancer preferred their oncologist handle their primary care during survivorship.4Better alignment of patient and provider preferences for physician roles during survivorship is necessary to support effective implementation of team-based...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Archana Radhakrishnan
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. Chandler McLeod
    • 1
  • Ann S. Hamilton
    • 2
  • Kevin C. Ward
    • 3
  • Steven J. Katz
    • 1
    • 4
  • Sarah T. Hawley
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  • Lauren P. Wallner
    • 1
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Management and PolicyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  5. 5.Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & DevelopmentAnn ArborUSA
  6. 6.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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