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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 344–345 | Cite as

A Curriculum for Diagnostic Reasoning: JGIM’s Exercises in Clinical Reasoning

  • Akshai Subramanian
  • Denise M. Connor
  • Gabrielle Berger
  • Juan N. Lessing
  • Neil Mehta
  • Reza Manesh
  • Jeffrey KohlwesEmail author
Concise Research Report

INTRODUCTION

In 2013, an estimated 251,000 deaths occurred due to medical error in the USA.1 Diagnostic errors make up a subset of these errors. Improving Diagnosis in Health Care advocates for training in clinical reasoning (CR) as a preventative strategy.2 However, there are few available resources to aid clinician-educators in teaching CR.

To advance professional development in teaching foundational CR concepts, the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM) initiated the Exercises in Clinical Reasoning (ECR) series.3 This series utilizes expert clinicians’ discussions of challenging cases to demystify the CR process. We created a novel open-access online CR toolbox with downloadable teaching modules based on the print ECR series.4 By using this toolbox, teachers can engage learners in the case-based application of core CR concepts. In this report, we describe the process of developing this resource, its current usage statistics, and goals for future assessment and development.

METHODS...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Manesh is supported by the Jeremiah A. Barondess Fellowship in the Clinical Transaction of the New York Academy of Medicine, in collaboration with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). No other conflict of interest exists, financial or others, to the best of our knowledge.

References

  1. 1.
    Makary MA, Michael D. Medical error – the third leading cause of death in the US. BMJ. 2016;353:i2139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Improving Diagnosis in Health Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2015.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Henderson M, Keenan C, Kohlwes J, Dhaliwal G. Introducing exercises in clinical reasoning. J Gen Intern Med. 2010;25(1):9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Clinical Reasoning Exercises: Introduction to Exercise in Clinical Reasoning. Available at: https://www.sgim.org/web-only/clinical-reasoning-exercises. Accessed 9 June 2018.
  5. 5.
    Vergel J, Stentoft D, Montoya J. Extending the theoretical framework for curriculum integration in pre-clinical medical education. Perspectives on Medical Education. 2017;6(4):246–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine (This is a U.S. government work and not under copyright protection in the U.S.; foreign copyright protection may apply) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akshai Subramanian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Denise M. Connor
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gabrielle Berger
    • 3
  • Juan N. Lessing
    • 4
  • Neil Mehta
    • 5
  • Reza Manesh
    • 6
  • Jeffrey Kohlwes
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.University of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.University of Colorado School of MedicineAuroraUSA
  5. 5.Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  6. 6.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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