Socio-Economic Status and Prevalence of Self-Reported Osteoporosis in Tehran: Results from a Large Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study (Urban HEART-2)

  • M. Asadi-Lari
  • Y. Salimi
  • M. R. Vaez-Mahdavi
  • S. Faghihzadeh
  • A. A. Haeri Mehrizi
  • Z. Jorjoran Shushtari
  • Bahman Cheraghian
Article
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

Osteoporosis is a widespread disease among older peoples. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of self-reported osteoporosis and assessing its association with socio-economic status. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in 2011. Participants were 45,990 individuals aged above 20 years from 22 urban districts. Osteoporosis was measured by self-administrative questionnaire. Wealth index was constructed using principal component analysis based on household assets. Chi-square test, chi square test for trend, and crude odds ratio were used to assess associations in univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression utilized to estimate adjusted associations between self-reported osteoporosis and socio-economic status.

The overall estimated prevalence of self-reported osteoporosis was 4% (95% CI 3.88–4.13), 1.19% in men, and 6.84% in women (P < 0.001). The prevalence increased considerably as age increased (P for trend < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, education and wealth status were negative, and smoking was positively associated with the prevalence of self-reported osteoporosis. No association was found between participants’ skill levels and Townsend deprivation index with the prevalence of self-reported osteoporosis.

The findings of the present study have improved understanding of the association between socioeconomic status and osteoporosis in the Iranian population. It is important to consider socioeconomic status in screening and prevention programs.

Keywords

Osteoporosis Self-reporting Prevalence Socioeconomic status Tehran 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project is supported by Iran University of Medical Sciences.

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Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Asadi-Lari
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Salimi
    • 3
  • M. R. Vaez-Mahdavi
    • 4
  • S. Faghihzadeh
    • 5
  • A. A. Haeri Mehrizi
    • 6
  • Z. Jorjoran Shushtari
    • 7
  • Bahman Cheraghian
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthIran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Oncopathology Research CentreIran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthKermanshah University of Medical ScienceKermanshahIran
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologyShahed UniversityTehranIran
  5. 5.Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of MedicineZanjan University of Medical SciencesZanjanIran
  6. 6.Health Education and Promotion Research Group, Health Metrics Research CenterIranian Institute for Health Sciences Research, ACECRTehranIran
  7. 7.Determinants of Health, Social Determinants of Health Research CentreUniversity of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation SciencesTehranIran
  8. 8.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthAhvaz Jundishapur University of Medical SciencesAhvazIran

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