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Automatic seizure detection based on kernel robust probabilistic collaborative representation

  • Zuyi Yu
  • Weidong Zhou
  • Fan Zhang
  • Fangzhou Xu
  • Shasha Yuan
  • Yan Leng
  • Yang Li
  • Qi Yuan
Original Article
  • 42 Downloads

Abstract

Visual inspection of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for epilepsy diagnosis is very time-consuming. Therefore, much research is devoted to developing a computer-assisted diagnostic system to relieve the workload of neurologists. In this study, a kernel version of the robust probabilistic collaborative representation-based classifier (R-ProCRC) is proposed for the detection of epileptic EEG signals. The kernel R-ProCRC jointly maximizes the likelihood that a test EEG sample belongs to each of the two classes (seizure and non-seizure), and uses the kernel function method to map the EEG samples into the higher dimensional space to relieve the problem that they are linearly non-separable in the original space. The wavelet transform with five scales is first employed to process the raw EEG signals. Next, the test EEG samples are collaboratively represented on the training sets by the kernel R-ProCRC and they are categorized by checking which class has the maximum likelihood. Finally, post-processing is deployed to reduce misjudgment and acquire more stable results. This method is evaluated on two EEG databases and yields an accuracy of 99.3% for interictal and ictal EEGs on the Bonn database. In addition, the average sensitivity of 97.48% and specificity of 96.81% are achieved from the Freiburg database.

Graphical abstract

Visual inspection of EEG recordings for epilepsy diagnosis is very time-consuming. Therefore, many researchers are devoted to developing a computer-assisted diagnostic system to relieve the workload of neurologists. In this paper, a kernel version of the robust probabilistic collaborative representation based classifier (R-ProCRC) is proposed for the detection of epileptic EEG signals. The kernel R-ProCRC jointly maximizes the likelihood that a test EEG sample belongs to each of the two classes, i.e., seizure and non-seizure, and uses the kernel function method to map the EEG samples into the higher dimensional space to relieve the problem that they are linearly non-separable in the original space. The main procedures of the proposed method are exhibited in the two figures as following,

Fig. 1 The main procedures of the proposed method. (a) The schematic diagram of EEG classification based on the Freiburg database. (b) The detailed procedures of the kernel R-ProCRC

This method has been evaluated on two different types of EEG databases and shows superior performance.

Keywords

EEG Seizure detection Probabilistic collaborative representation Kernel function method 

Notes

Funding information

This work was jointly financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61501283, No. 61701279, No. 61701270 and No. 61401259), the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation (No. ZR2015PF012 and No. ZR2017PF006), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2015 M582129 and No. 2015 M582128).

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Medical Physics and Image Processing Technology, School of Physics and ElectronicsShandong Normal UniversityJinanChina
  2. 2.Shenzhen Institute of Shandong UniversityShenzhenChina
  3. 3.Technical Department of Jinan BranchShandong Cable Interactive Service LTDJinanChina
  4. 4.School of Electrical Engineering and AutomationQilu University of TechnologyJinanChina
  5. 5.School of Information Science and EngineeringQufu Normal UniversityRizhaoChina
  6. 6.School of Physics and ElectronicsShandong Normal UniversityJi’nanPeople’s Republic of China

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