Advertisement

Correction to: Gender Differences in the Association between Cyberbullying Victimization and Perpetration: the Role of Anger Rumination and Traditional Bullying Experiences

  • Ágnes Zsila
  • Róbert Urbán
  • Mark D. GriffithsEmail author
  • Zsolt Demetrovics
Correction
  • 87 Downloads

Correction to: Int J Ment Health Addiction

  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-018-9893-9

Unfortunately, the original version of this article (Zsila et al. 2018) contained an error. The first moderation model relating to the second hypothesis (i.e., testing the moderating role of anger rumination in the association between past cyberbullying victimization and recent cyberbullying perpetration among males) yielded a significant interaction term; however, the association was not positive but negative, indicating that low anger rumination elevates the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among males who had been victimized in cyberbullying in the past, while high anger rumination elevates the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among males without a history of cyberbullying victimization.

Therefore, the interpretation of the results should be corrected in several parts of the original manuscript (listed below).

Abstract

Original:

Furthermore, high anger rumination elevated the risk of perpetration among male cyberbullying victims, while repeated victimization in traditional bullying increased the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among females.

Correction:

Furthermore, low anger rumination elevated the risk of perpetration among male cyberbullying victims, while repeated victimization in traditional bullying increased the risk of cyberbullying perpetration among females.

Page 10, H2:

Original:

When testing the moderator effect of anger rumination among males in this association, the interaction term was significant (B = −0.75 [−1.45 to 0.06]; p = 0.03), indicating that male CB victims who tended to ruminate about past anger experiences were more likely to become a CB perpetrator.

Correction:

When testing the moderator effect of anger rumination among males in this association, the interaction term was significant (B = −0.75 [−1.45 to 0.06]; p = 0.03), indicating that male CB victims with low anger rumination were more likely to become a CB perpetrator.

Page 10, H2:

Original:

Therefore, the second hypothesis was supported.

Correction:

Therefore, the second hypothesis was not supported.

Page 11, Discussion:

Original:

Furthermore, anger ruminative tendencies elevated the risk of CB perpetration among males with a history of past CB victimization.

Correction:

Furthermore low anger rumination elevated the risk of CB perpetration among males with a history of past CB victimization.

Page 13, Discussion:

Original:

In the present study, the moderating role of anger rumination in the association between past CB victimization and recent CB perpetration was demonstrated only among males, indicating that males who tend to ruminate about past experiences of anger are more likely to become a bully when experiencing bullying as a victim. Therefore, the second hypothesis was confirmed.

Correction:

In the present study, the moderating role of anger rumination in the association between past CB victimization and recent CB perpetration was demonstrated only among males, indicating that males who tend to ruminate about past experiences of anger are less likely to become a bully when experiencing bullying as a victim. This was an unexpected result; therefore, the second hypothesis was not confirmed.

Page 13, Discussion:

Original:

Given that males have been found to exhibit more aggressive behaviors than females (see Bettencourt and Miller 1996 for a review) and are more likely to react to stressful events (e.g., conflicts) using a direct confrontation approach over avoidance (Taylor et al. 2000; Turton and Campbell 2005), it might be the case that those male victims who tend to ruminate about past angry episodes are more likely to fantasize about revenge (Sukhodolsky et al. 2001), and that such hostile thoughts might lead to a greater probability of actual retaliation.

Correction:

Given that males have been found to exhibit more aggressive behaviors than females (see Bettencourt and Miller 1996 for a review) and are more likely to react to stressful events (e.g., conflicts) using a direct confrontation approach over avoidance (Taylor et al. 2000; Turton and Campbell 2005), it might be the case that those male victims who tend to ruminate about past angry episodes are more likely to fantasize about revenge (Sukhodolsky et al. 2001), which might prevent them from actual retaliation as frustration can be relieved through fantasies about revenge, while male victims without anger ruminative tendencies may be more likely to act immediately and choose direct confrontation instead of planning revenge and immersing in vengeful thoughts. By contrast, anger rumination elevates the risk of perpetration among males without previous experience in cyberbullying, which indicates that hostile thoughts lead to a greater probability of actual acts among those without previous personal involvement in online aggression.

Page 14, Discussion:

Original:

Furthermore, prevention and intervention efforts may benefit from using a more targeted approach to alleviate anger and negative emotions in male and female victims that experience different forms of bullying, in order to reduce the risk of future offending.

Correction:

Furthermore, prevention and intervention efforts may benefit from using a more targeted approach to alleviate negative emotions in male and female victims that experience different forms of bullying, in order to reduce the risk of future offending.

Notes

Reference

  1. Zsila, Á., Urbán, R., Griffiths, M. D., & Demetrovics, Z. (2018). Gender differences in the association between cyberbullying victimization and perpetration: The role of anger rumination and traditional bullying experiences. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-018-9893-9.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ágnes Zsila
    • 1
    • 2
  • Róbert Urbán
    • 2
  • Mark D. Griffiths
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Zsolt Demetrovics
    • 2
  1. 1.School of PsychologyELTE Eötvös Loránd UniversityBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Institute of PsychologyELTE Eötvös Loránd UniversityBudapestHungary
  3. 3.Psychology DepartmentNottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  4. 4.International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology DepartmentNottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK

Personalised recommendations