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Plasmonics

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 293–302 | Cite as

Behavioral and Modal Analysis of Graphene-Based Polygonal Optical Antenna for Enhanced Bio-molecular Detection

  • Rachakonda A. N. S. Aditya
  • Anand Sreekantan ThampyEmail author
Article
  • 95 Downloads

Abstract

Graphene-based polygonal optical antenna is designed and analyzed for enhanced bio-molecular detection. Absorption cross section and electric field enhancement factors of three polygonal structures are compared. The hexagonal structure has exhibited 50% better absorption cross section as compared to that of other structures. Variation of electric field enhancement with frequency is studied and observed on the basis of mode theory. The hexagonal structure has shown an increment in electric field enhancement by 16.60 and 24.11% in contrast to the circular and rhombic structures respectively. Approximation of the hexagonal antenna structure using lumped equivalent circuit is done for better intuition. The vitality of the hexagonal optical antenna for bio-molecular detection is discussed with the aid of chemical potential tuning.

Keywords

Graphene Edge effect Chemical potential Field enhancement Mode theory Electrical breakdown 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachakonda A. N. S. Aditya
    • 1
  • Anand Sreekantan Thampy
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Communication Engineering, School of Electronics EngineeringVellore Institute of TechnologyVellore 632014India

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