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Plasmonics

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 219–230 | Cite as

Magnetic Field Effect on Fresnel Coefficients of the Thin Slab of Graphite Nanocomposite

  • N. Sepehri JavanEmail author
  • F. Rouhi Erdi
Article
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

In this theoretical study, optical properties of a thin slab including graphite nanoparticles doped in a host medium such as silica and silicon have been investigated. A constant magnetic field is used for controlling Fresnel coefficients of the slab. Depending on the direction of the normal vector of the basal plane of the graphite structure with respect to the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave (perpendicular or parallel), optical behavior of graphite is different. Electric permittivity of an individual magnetized graphite nanoparticle is calculated by a semi-empirical Drude-like model for both kinds of the normal vector of the basal plane orientation. By means of well-known Maxwell-Garnett theory, effective permittivity of the magnetized nanocomposite slab is obtained. It is shown that at the mid-IR frequency range, exerting a magnetic field of few hundred Tesla can lead to the substantial variations of Fresnel coefficients. Effect of the magnetic field on the optical properties of the slab is more evident when the population of the graphite nanoparticles with the parallel orientation of the basal plane is increased.

Keywords

Nanocomposite Graphite Drude model Maxwell-Garnett Fresnel coefficients Basal plane Magnetic field Absorption 

Notes

Funding Information

The authors of the present article would like to acknowledge the financial support of the Iran National Science Foundation (INSF).

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of Mohaghegh ArdabiliArdabilIran

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