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Chinese students’ intentions to use the Internet-based technology for learning

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Abstract

This large-scale study used the extended technology acceptance model to examine the different factors influencing Chinese university students’ intentions to use the Internet-based technology with a learning focus. Specifically, the subject norm was conceptualised as a three-dimensional construct consisting of teacher influence, peer influence and institutional support. The data were collected from 4561 university students from 16 universities in China. The results indicated that 64% of the variance in Chinese university students’ behavioural intentions were explained by their perceptions of ease of use and that the subjective norm significantly influenced their perceptions of the usefulness of the Internet-based technology with a learning focus. Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and the subjective norm significantly influenced students’ attitudes towards using the Internet-based technology with a learning focus. In addition, Chinese university students’ intentions to use the Internet-based technology with a learning focus were significantly influenced by attitude, perceived usefulness and the subjective norm. This study identified both theoretical and practical explanations for these relationships.

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Funding

This research was funded by University of Macau (Project Number: MYRG2015-00022-FED).

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Correspondence to Fang Huang.

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Appendix A

Appendix A

Perceived usefulness (PU) (adapted from Davis 1989)

PU1:

Using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) enables me to finish my homework more quickly

PU2:

Using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) improves my performance

PU3:

Using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) increases my productivity

PU4:

Using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) enhances my effectiveness

PU5:

The Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) is useful for my education

Perceived ease of use (PEU) (adapted from Davis 1989)

PEU1:

I can use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to learn easily

PEU2:

I can learn to use the new Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) easily

PEU3:

Learning to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) is easy for me

PEU4:

I find it easy to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to do what I want

PEU5:

It is easy for me to become skilful at using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform)

PEU6:

I find the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) easy to use

Attitude towards using (ATU) (adapted from Davis 1989)

ATU1:

I like learning with the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform)

ATU2:

I have positive feelings towards using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to learn

ATU3:

I think it is a good idea to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to learn

Behavioural intention to use the Internet for learning (BI) (adapted from Davis 1989)

BI1:

I intend to learn using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) in the future

BI2:

I expect that I will use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to learn in the future

BI3:

I plan to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to learn in the future

Instructor influence (II) [adapted from Lai and Chen 2011)]

II1:

My instructor thinks that the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) is valuable for learning

II2:

My instructor’s opinions are important to me

II3:

If my instructor started to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to support his/her teaching, I would be encouraged to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning

Peer influence (PI) (adapted from Lai and Chen 2011)

PI1:

My classmates think that using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) is valuable for learning

PI2:

My classmates’ opinions are important to me

PI3:

If most of my classmates started to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) to support their learning, this would encourage me to do the same

Institutional support (IS) (adapted from Lai and Chen 2011)

IS1:

My school is committed to a vision of using the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning

IS2:

My school is committed to supporting my efforts to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning

IS3:

My school strongly encourages the use of the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning

IS4:

My school will recognise my efforts to use the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning

IS5:

The use of the Internet (Baidu, Google, learning platform) for learning is important to my school

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Huang, F., Teo, T. & Zhou, M. Chinese students’ intentions to use the Internet-based technology for learning. Education Tech Research Dev 68, 575–591 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-019-09695-y

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Keywords

  • Intentions to use
  • Internet
  • Subjective norm
  • University students
  • China