Journal of Natural Medicines

, Volume 71, Issue 4, pp 776–779 | Cite as

A new biphenyl ether derivative produced by Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium albobiverticillium

  • Deiske A. Sumilat
  • Hiroyuki Yamazaki
  • Kotaro Endo
  • Henki Rotinsulu
  • Defny S. Wewengkang
  • Kazuyo Ukai
  • Michio Namikoshi
Note

Abstract

A new biphenyl ether derivative, 2-hydroxy-6-(2′-hydroxy-3′-hydroxymethyl-5-methylphenoxy)-benzoic acid (1), was isolated together with the known benzophenone derivative, monodictyphenone (2), from a culture broth of Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium albobiverticillium TPU1432 by solvent extraction, ODS column chromatography, and preparative HPLC (ODS). The structure of 1 was elucidated based on NMR experiments. Compound 2 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B, T cell PTP (TCPTP), and CD45 tyrosine phosphatase (CD45), whereas compound 1 modestly inhibited CD45 activity.

Keywords

Biphenyl ether Ascidian-derived fungus Penicillium albobiverticillium Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B Inhibitor 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (25870660 and 16K21310) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) of Japan to HY, the Takeda Science Foundation to HY, the Kanae Foundation for the Promotion of Medical Science to HY, and a grant for Basic Science Research Projects from the Sumitomo Foundation to HY. We express our thanks to Mr. T. Matsuki and S. Sato of Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University for measuring mass spectra and to Mr. T. Miura, Y. Bunya, T. Togashi, and Ms. S. Sugai of Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University for their technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer Japan 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deiske A. Sumilat
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Yamazaki
    • 1
  • Kotaro Endo
    • 1
  • Henki Rotinsulu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Defny S. Wewengkang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Kazuyo Ukai
    • 1
  • Michio Namikoshi
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesTohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical UniversitySendaiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Fisheries and Marine ScienceSam Ratulangi UniversityManadoIndonesia
  3. 3.Faculty of Mathematic and Natural SciencesSam Ratulangi UniversityManadoIndonesia

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