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Asian Journal of Criminology

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 61–76 | Cite as

Who Are the Most-Cited Scholars in Asian Criminology Compared with Australia, New Zealand, North America, and Europe?

  • David P. FarringtonEmail author
  • Ellen G. Cohn
  • Amaia Iratzoqui
Article

Abstract

Asian criminology is a fast-growing area of criminological research, but its influence on the international criminological landscape is largely unknown. The current article examines scholarly influence by studying citations in four international criminology journals (AJC—Asian Journal of Criminology, ANZ—Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, CRIM—Criminology, and EJC—European Journal of Criminology) over a 10-year period from 2006 to 2015. Generally, the most-cited scholars in AJC overlapped with the most-cited scholars in the other three journals. The most-cited scholars in AJC tended to be based in the USA, working in the area of developmental and life-course criminology, and highly cited in the other three journals. Overall, Robert J. Sampson was the most-cited scholar in these four journals. Few scholars based in Asia were highly cited in ANZ, CRIM, or EJC, at least partly because few Asian scholars authored articles in these journals. We conclude that Asian scholars should be encouraged to carry out research that would interest international scholars and to submit their work for publication not only in AJC but also in other international journals.

Keywords

Scholarly influence Asian criminology Most-cited scholars Most-cited works Developmental and life-course criminology 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

This article does not involve any studies with human participants or animals as performed by the authors.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Farrington
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ellen G. Cohn
    • 2
  • Amaia Iratzoqui
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of CriminologyCambridge UniversityCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Department of Criminology and Criminal JusticeFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Department of Criminology and Criminal JusticeUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA

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