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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 26, Issue 33, pp 34479–34486 | Cite as

The mediated role of complement C3 in PM2.5 exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus: an elderly panel study in Beijing, China

  • Yuanren Tong
  • Lu Pei
  • Kai Luo
  • Meiduo Zhao
  • Jing Xu
  • Ang Li
  • Runkui Li
  • Mingan Yang
  • Qun XuEmail author
Research Article
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic disease worldwide. Ambient air pollution has long been proven to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progression, but the underlying mechanism is not clear yet. In addition, previous studies mainly focused on the prevention of healthy people against the incidence of T2DM. We designed a panel study including two follow-ups and enrolled 39 patients with T2DM living in Beijing. Linear mixed model was fitted to assess the association between two pairs of variables (ambient air pollution exposure and C3 levels, ambient air pollution exposures and T2DM index). Mediation analysis of C3 between ambient air pollution exposure and indicators of T2DM progression was conducted. We found that PM2.5 exposures is are negatively associated with serum complement C3. Given that C3 might act as a protector of pancreas β cell, PM2.5 exposures could accelerate disease in T2DM populations. No mediation effects were found. This study reveals that exposures to PM2.5 can cause progression of diseases among T2DM populations.

Keywords

Diabetes mellitus T2DM population PM2.5 C3 Mediation effects 

Notes

Funding information

This study was supported by the China Medical Board (Grant No. 15-230); the Gong-Yi Program of Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (Grant No. 200909016); The Chinese Academy of Medical Science Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (Grant No. 2017-I2M-1-009); National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41771435); China Scholarship Council (Grant No. 201704910297); and the Program of Science and Technology Service Network Initiative (STS) of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y88Q0300YD).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuanren Tong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lu Pei
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kai Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Meiduo Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jing Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ang Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Runkui Li
    • 3
    • 4
  • Mingan Yang
    • 5
  • Qun Xu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesSchool of Basic Medicine Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  2. 2.Center of Environmental and Health Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesPeking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  3. 3.College of Resources and EnvironmentUniversity of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  5. 5.Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public HealthSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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