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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 26, Issue 26, pp 27043–27051 | Cite as

Prediction of biogas and pressure from rumen fermentation using plant extracts to enhance biodigestibility and mitigate biogases

  • Tolulope O. FaniyiEmail author
  • Ênio R. Prates
  • Moyosore J. Adegbeye
  • Micheal K. Adewumi
  • Mona M. M. Y. Elghandour
  • Abdelfattah Z. M. SalemEmail author
  • Luciano A. Ritt
  • Angel Sánchez Zubieta
  • Laion Stella
  • Elvis Ticiani
  • Akaninyene A. Jack
Research Article
  • 79 Downloads

Abstract

Improving digestibility, fermentation characteristics, and reducing greenhouse biogases to protect the environment without the use of synthetic materials is an important goal of modern-day farming and nutritionist. Plant extracts are capable of solving these. This is due to the digestive enzymes and the bioactive components capable of performing antimicrobial functions inherent in these plants. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of standard maize substrate treated with selected herbs and spices extracts on ruminal environmental biogas production and pressure during fermentation via biogas production technique. Herbs (Azadirachta indica leaves (T1), Moringa oleifera leaves (T2), Ocimum gratissimum leaves (T3) and spices (Allium sativum bulb (T4), Zingiber officinale rhizome (T5)) were harvested, air dried, and milled using standard procedures. Methanolic extracts of the herbs and spices were prepared and used as additives at different concentrations (50, 100, and 150 μL) to the maize substrate for in vitro biogas production. Data were analyzed using regression analysis. There were significant (P < 0.05) differences across all the treatments on the volume and pressure of biogas. The pressure and volume of biogas when compared with the levels tested showed differences (P < 0.05) across all the treatments for the prediction of volume from pressure of biogas. The pressure and volume of gas produced in vitro increased (P < 0.05) and biogases decreased (P < 0.05) by the substrate treated with herbs and spices but for the drum stick leaves which was similar for the levels of concentration tested. This means that the level tested had a pronounced mitigation effect on pressure of biogas and volume of biogas produced. It was concluded that the herb and spice extracts have the potential to improve rumen fermentation and reduce the production of biogases in ruminant diet.

Keywords

Biogas Environment Plant extracts Pressure Rumen 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The first author appreciates the financial support of CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnological – Brazillian Scientific and Technological Development Council) and TWAS (The World Academy of Science) in the research and in writing.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tolulope O. Faniyi
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ênio R. Prates
    • 2
  • Moyosore J. Adegbeye
    • 3
  • Micheal K. Adewumi
    • 1
  • Mona M. M. Y. Elghandour
    • 4
  • Abdelfattah Z. M. Salem
    • 4
    Email author
  • Luciano A. Ritt
    • 2
  • Angel Sánchez Zubieta
    • 2
  • Laion Stella
    • 2
  • Elvis Ticiani
    • 2
  • Akaninyene A. Jack
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Animal Science (Animal Production and Management) Faculty of Agriculture and ForestryUniversity of IbadanIbadanNigeria
  2. 2.Faculdade de Agronomia, Departamento de ZootecniaUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  3. 3.Department of Animal science, College of AgricultureJoseph Ayo Babalola UniversityIkeji-ArakejiNigeria
  4. 4.Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y ZootecniaUniversidad Autónoma del Estado de MéxicoTolucaMexico

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