Advertisement

Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 25, Issue 31, pp 31593–31602 | Cite as

Uptake effects of toxic heavy metals from growth soils into jujube and persimmon of China

  • Yuewen Zheng
  • Danyu Shen
  • Shutian Wu
  • Yongxiang Han
  • Shiliang Li
  • Fubin Tang
  • Zhanglin Ni
  • Runhong Mo
  • Yihua Liu
Research Article
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

Compared with other agricultural plants, information about uptake effects of toxic heavy metals from growth soils into persimmon and jujube are scarce. In this study, the single and comprehensive uptake effects of five toxic heavy metals (Pb, As, Cd, Cr, and Hg) between the two fruits and their growth soils were investigated. The results showed that the average concentrations of heavy metals in the two fruits were found to be 30 (Pb), 6.6 (As), 2.3 (Cd), 38 (Cr), and 0.33 (Hg) μg/kg, respectively. The average concentrations of heavy metals in their growth soils were 26.31 (Pb), 9.63 (As), 0.12 (Cd), 57.6 (Cr), and 0.049 (Hg) mg/kg, respectively. An uptake effect was observed for the two fruits. The values of Nemerow pollution index (NPI) in the two fruits and their growth soils were 0.10 and 0.55, respectively. The average bioconcentration factor (BCF) values of Pb, As, Cd, Cr, and Hg in the two fruits were 0.0012, 0.00075, 0.021, 0.00077, and 0.012, respectively. Based on the residue levels of toxic heavy metals in the growth soils and soil parameters, the prediction models for NPI and BCF were established, with the adjusted regression coefficients of 0.65 (NPI) and 0.81 (BCF). The contribution rates of different soil parameters to NPI were 21.7% (OC), 16.1% (Pb), 17.1% (Cr), 19.8% (Cd), and 25.4% (As), respectively. The contribution rates of different soil parameters to BCF were 10.2% (OC), 9.4% (Cr), and 80.4% (Cd), respectively.

Keywords

Persimmon Jujube Heavy metal Uptake effect Prediction model 

Notes

Funding information

This study was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds of CAF (CAFYBB2017QC002) and the Special Fund for Forestry Scientific Research in the Public Interest (201304705).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

11356_2018_2959_MOESM1_ESM.docx (38 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 37 kb)

References

  1. Abdoulazize S (2016) Potential benefits of jujube (Zizyphus Lotus L.) bioactive compounds for nutrition and health. J Nutr Metab 2016:1–13CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bi XY, Ren LM, Gong M, He YS, Wang L, Ma ZD (2010) Transfer of cadmium and lead from soil to mangoes in an uncontaminated area, Hainan Island, China. Geoderma 155:115–120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chang CY, Yu HY, Chen JJ, Li FB, Zhang HH, Liu CP (2014) Accumulation of heavy metals in leaf vegetables from agricultural soils and associated potential health risks in the Pearl River Delta, South China. Environ Monit Assess 186:1547–1560CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chen TB, Zheng YM, Lei M, Huang ZC, Wu HT, Chen H, Fan KK, Yu K, Wu X, Tian QZ (2005) Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surface soils of urban parks in Beijing, China. Chemosphere 60:542–551CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chen Y, Huang B, Hu WY, Weindorf DC, Liu XX, Niedermann S (2014) Assessing the risks of trace elements in environmental materials under selected greenhouse vegetable production systems of China. Sci Total Environ 470:1140–1150CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cheng JJ, Ding CF, Li XG, Zhang TL, Wang XX (2015) Heavy metals in navel orange orchards of Xinfeng County and their transfer from soils to navel oranges. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 122:153–158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dai YC, Lv JL, Liu K, Zhao XY, Cao YF (2016) Major controlling factors and prediction models for arsenic uptake from soil to wheat plants. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 130:256–262CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ding CF, Zhang TL, Wang XX, Zhou F, Yang YR, Huang GF (2013) Prediction model for cadmium transfer from soil to carrot (Daucus carota L.) and its application to derive soil thresholds for food safety. J Agric Food Chem 61:10273–10282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ding CF, Zhang TL, Li XG, Wang XX (2014) Major controlling factors and prediction models for mercury transfer from soil to carrot. J Soils Sediments 14:1136–1146CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ding CF, Ma YB, Li XG, Zhang TL, Wang XX (2018) Determination and validation of soil thresholds for cadmium based on food quality standard and health risk assessment. Sci Total Environ 619:700–706CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gan YD, Wang LH, Yang GQ, Dai JL, Wang RQ, Wang WX (2017) Multiple factors impact the contents of heavy metals in vegetables in high natural background area of China. Chemosphere 184:1388–1395CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Ganeshan S, Leis M, Drinkwater JM, Madsen LT, Jain JC, Chibbar RN (2012) In vitro-cultured wheat spikes provide a simplified alternative for studies of cadmium uptake in developing grains. J Sci Food Agric 92:1740–1747CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Giri S, Singh AK (2017) Human health risk assessment due to dietary intake of heavy metals through rice in the mining areas of Singhbhum Copper Belt, India. Environ Sci Pollut Res 24:14945–14956CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Han Y, Ni Z, Li S, Qu M, Tang F, Mo R, Ye C, Liu Y (2018) Distribution, relationship, and risk assessment of toxic heavy metals in walnuts and growth soil. Environ Sci Pollut Res 25:1–10Google Scholar
  15. Han YX, Mo RH, Yuan XY, Zhong DL, Tang FB, Ye CF, Liu YH (2017) Pesticide residues in nut-planted soils of China and their relationship between nut/soil. Chemosphere 180:42–47CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. He J, Zhu C, Ren Y, Yan Y, Jiang D (2010) Genotypic variation in grain cadmium concentration of lowland rice. J Plant Nutr Soil Sci 169:711–716CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Khan K, Lu Y, Khan H, Ishtiaq M, Khan S, Waqas M, Wei L, Wang T (2013) Heavy metals in agricultural soils and crops and their health risks in Swat District, northern Pakistan. Food Chem Toxicol 58:449–458CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Kim YY, Yang YY, Lee Y (2002) Pb and Cd uptake in rice roots. Physiol Plant 116:368–372CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Li B, Wang YH, Jiang Y, Li GC, Cui JH, Wang Y, Zhang H, Wang SC, Xu S, Wang RZ (2016) The accumulation and health risk of heavy metals in vegetables around a zinc smelter in northeastern China. Environ Sci Pollut Res 23:25114–25126CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Liu Y, Shen D, Zhong D, Mo R, Ni Z, Tang F (2014) Time-dependent movement and distribution of chlorpyrifos and its metabolism in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching. J Agric Food Chem 62:6565–6570CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Liu Y, Li S, Ni Z, Qu M, Zhong D, Ye C, Tang F (2016) Pesticides in persimmons, jujubes and soil from China: residue levels, risk assessment and relationship between fruits and soils. Sci Total Environ 542:620–628CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. LombnÆS P, Singh BR (2004) Predicting Zn and Cu status in cereals – potential for a multiple regression model using soil parameters. J Agric Sci 141:349–357CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Mazurek R, Kowalska J, Gasiorek M, Zadrozny P, Jozefowska A, Zaleski T, Kepka W, Tymczuk M, Orlowska K (2017) Assessment of heavy metals contamination in surface layers of Roztocze National Park forest soils (SE Poland) by indices of pollution. Chemosphere 168:839–850CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Nawab J, Li G, Khan S, Sher H, Aamir M, Shamshad I, Khan A, Khan MA (2016) Health risk assessment from contaminated foodstuffs: a field study in chromite mining-affected areas northern Pakistan. Environ Sci Pollut Res 23:12227–12236CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Nie J-Y, Kuang L-X, Li Z-X, Xu W-H, Wang C, Chen Q-S, Li A, Zhao X-B, Xie H-Z, Zhao D-Y, Wu Y-L, Cheng Y (2016) Assessing the concentration and potential health risk of heavy metals in China’s main deciduous fruits. J Integr Agric 15:1645–1655CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Ran J, Wang D, Wang C, Zhang G, Zhang H (2016) Heavy metal contents, distribution, and prediction in a regional soil-wheat system. Sci Total Environ 544:422–431CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Wang G, Su MY, Chen YH, Lin FF, Luo D, Gao SF (2006) Transfer characteristics of cadmium and lead from soil to the edible parts of six vegetable species in southeastern China. Environ Pollut 144:127–135CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Wang SY, Wu WY, Liu F, Liao RK, Hu YQ (2017) Accumulation of heavy metals in soil-crop systems: a review for wheat and corn. Environ Sci Pollut Res 24:15209–15225CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ye XX, Li HY, Ma YB, Wu L, Sun B (2014) The bioaccumulation of Cd in rice grains in paddy soils as affected and predicted by soil properties. J Soils Sediments 14:1407–1416CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Zhu F, Yang S, Fan W, Wang A, Hao H, Yao S (2014) Heavy metals in jujubes and their potential health risks to the adult consumers in Xinjiang province, China. Environ Monit Assess 186:6039–6046CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Institute of Subtropical ForestryChinese Academy of ForestryFuyangChina

Personalised recommendations