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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 7476–7485 | Cite as

In situ resuspension rate monitoring method in the littoral zone with multi-ecotypes of a shallow wind-disturbed lake

  • Chuang Qi
  • Xiao-guang Xu
  • Kuan Shi
  • Li-min ZhangEmail author
  • Yang Zhou
  • Hui Lin
  • Xin-ting Wu
  • Guo-xiang WangEmail author
  • Han Meng
Research Article

Abstract

Sediment resuspension has been recognized as a crucial internal process in aquatic ecosystems. However, there is still a lack of reliable measuring methods due to the complex hydrodynamic conditions in large shallow eutrophic lakes. In this study, sequential sediment traps (SST) and instantaneous multiple point (IMP) methods were compared at 6 sites located in the littoral zone of Zhushan Bay in Lake Taihu. Results show that the average resuspension rates (RRs) estimated using the IMP method at sites 1 to 6 were 266.39, 272.79, 235.17, 254.95, 392.25, and 483.85 g·m−2d−1, respectively. While the RRs estimated using the SST method were 195.16, 236.99, 116.76, 156.23, 389.53, and 509.85 g·m−2d−1, respectively. In wind-disturbed areas, both methods were suitable for RR analysis in large and shallow eutrophic lakes and SST provides high-resolution temporal RR estimations. However, in the areas with cyanobacterial blooms and vegetation cover, the IMP method overestimated the RR. Therefore, SST was more suitable across different conditions in large and shallow eutrophic lakes, providing a simple, accurate, and high-resolution temporal estimation of RR, while furthering our understanding of lake evolution processes.

Keywords

Resuspension Sequential sediment traps Shallow lakes Littoral zone Cyanobacterial blooms Eutrophication 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Gratitude should also be extended to Ran Lu and Ziya Liu (School of Environment, Nanjing Normal University) for their valuable assistance with nutrient analysis in the laboratory.

Funding information

This research was supported by the National Water Pollution Control and Treatment Science and Technology Major Project (No. 2017ZX07203003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41573061), Research Projects of Water Environment Comprehensive Management in Lake Taihu of Jiangsu Province (No. TH2014402), and the Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province (No. KYCX17_1065).

Supplementary material

11356_2018_4059_MOESM1_ESM.docx (414 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 414 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuang Qi
    • 1
  • Xiao-guang Xu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Kuan Shi
    • 1
  • Li-min Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Yang Zhou
    • 1
  • Hui Lin
    • 1
  • Xin-ting Wu
    • 1
  • Guo-xiang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Han Meng
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EnvironmentNanjing Normal UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and ApplicationNanjingChina
  3. 3.Jiangsu Engineering Lab of Water and Soil Eco-remediationNanjing Normal UniversityNanjingChina
  4. 4.Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Ecological ConstructionNanjingChina

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