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Wireless Personal Communications

, Volume 104, Issue 4, pp 1599–1636 | Cite as

Novel Trust Based Energy Aware Routing Mechanism for Mitigation of Black Hole Attacks in MANET

  • R. Tino MerlinEmail author
  • R. Ravi
Article
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

The open transmission characteristics in wireless environments and scarce energy resources generated many challenging factors in MANET’s. Presently, MANET’s are highly employed in security related applications. Moreover, security problems and energy efficiency are considered as the supreme factors in MANET whereas, the security threats emerges out due to their scare resource characteristics; hence their functionalities are highly degraded with numerous security attacks namely, the cruel black hole attack (BHA). The BHA mainly distresses the data collection and makes an effort to engage in most of the links as possible to increase the resource constrained issues in the network. In order to withstand these issues, we propose a novel trust based energy aware routing (TEAR) mechanism for MANETs. The most important characteristics of TEAR mechanism is that it mitigates BHs through the dynamic generation of multiple detection routes to detect the BHs quickly as possible and provides better data route security by obtaining the nodal trust. More significantly, the TEAR mechanism can effectively handle both the creation and sharing of these multi-detection routes for the detection of BHs. Essentially, these multi-detection routes in TEAR mechanism are generated by wholly utilizing the energy in non-hotspots (i.e. without wasting the energy) to improve the energy efficiency and desired data route security. The theoretical and experimental analysis proved that our TEAR mechanism exhibited better performance than that of the earlier research works. The TEAR mechanism highly optimizes the lifespan of network by avoiding the black hole attacks and drastically increasing the probability of successful data routing.

Keywords

Trust Energy efficiency Security Black hole attack MANET Network lifespan 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Anna University Recognized Research CentreFrancis Xavier Engineering CollegeTirunelveliIndia

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