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The Critical Role of the Initial Stages of Cross-Sector Partnerships and Their Implications for Partnerships’ Outcomes

  • Hillel Schmid
  • Michal Almog-BarEmail author
Original Paper
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

The paper presents research findings on the initial stages of the life cycle of cross-sector partnerships in the social services. The findings clearly show the importance and impact of the initial stages on the establishment and institutionalization of the partnerships over time. These stages are mainly characterized by clarifying the common goals of the partnership, mobilizing support to achieve the goals, overcoming resistance and relieving fears while convincing opponents to change their attitudes toward the partnership, and formalizing and constructing administrative processes and procedures. Special attention is given to the emotional energy that the management and workers invest in the initial stages in order to overcome barriers as well as ideological, cultural, and procedural gaps between the partner organizations. The relationships between selected organizational properties that typify the initial stages of cross-sector partnerships and the achievement of goals and outcomes are presented, analyzed, and discussed.

Keywords

Cross-sector partnership Collaborations Life stages 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The research presented in this article was supported by a grant from the Government-Civil Society Initiative, a joint venture of the Prime Minister’s office, Welfare, Finance, Education, Health, Law, and Absorption Israeli governmental ministries, and the JDC Israel Institute for Leadership and Governance.

Funding

This study was funded by a grant from the Government-Civil Society Initiative, a joint venture of the Prime Minister’s office, Welfare, Finance, Education, Health, Law, and Absorption Israeli governmental ministries, and the JDC Israel Institute for Leadership and Governance.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social WelfareHebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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