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The Social Progress of Nations Revisited

  • Richard J. EstesEmail author
Original Research
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

Social progress and well-being throughout the world has arrived at a critical turning point. Following decades of social losses among the world’s poorest developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America, the majority of these and other nations now are experiencing significant social gains. Using the Weighted Index of Social Progress (WISP18), the author traces the net social gains and social losses experienced by most the world’s nations over a 50-year time, ranging from 1970 to the present. The data reported draw on the author’s extensive data base of historical and contemporary social indicators and links the current study to his and other reports of social progress and well-being that have been published this period. Data are reported at four levels of analysis, i.e., that of the world-as-a-whole, regional (continental) data, subregional data using the preceding and, finally, for selected countries for which the changes have been most remarkable. The net social gains on the WISP18 and earlier version of the WISP portray very positive outcomes for the 162 countries included in the study (representing 95% of the world’s total population) for both the near- and long-term.

Keywords

International Comparative Social indicators Quality of life Well-being 50-Year time-series study Management Institute of Quality of Life Studies (MIQOLS) 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Policy and PracticeUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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