Advertisement

The secrets behind Web of Science’s DOI search

  • Junwen Zhu
  • Fang Liu
  • Weishu LiuEmail author
Article

Abstract

With the flourish of scientific literature, the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is increasingly adopted in academia to uniquely identify research articles. By using Web of Science’s DOI search, we find that millions of DOI names appear to begin with an alphabetic character which violates the naming rule of DOI. In this study, we try to uncover the secrets behind Web of Science’s DOI search and explain this mysterious phenomenon. A similar investigation is also conducted by using the Scopus database. A few suggestions are provided at the end of this paper.

Keywords

Digital Object Identifier Article number Web of Science Scopus 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant number 71801189), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant numbers LQ18G010005 and LQ18G030010) and Program of Humanities and Social Science of Education Ministry of China (Grant number 19YJC630101).

References

  1. Boudry, C., & Chartron, G. (2017). Availability of digital object identifiers in publications archived by PubMed. Scientometrics, 110(3), 1453–1469.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-016-2225-6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Franceschini, F., Maisano, D., & Mastrogiacomo, L. (2015). Errors in DOI indexing by bibliometric databases. Scientometrics, 102(3), 2181–2186.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-014-1503-4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Franceschini, F., Maisano, D., & Mastrogiacomo, L. (2016a). Empirical analysis and classification of database errors in Scopus and Web of Science. Journal of Informetrics, 10(4), 933–953.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2016.07.003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Franceschini, F., Maisano, D., & Mastrogiacomo, L. (2016b). The museum of errors/horrors in Scopus. Journal of Informetrics, 10(1), 174–182.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2015.11.006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gorraiz, J., Melero-Fuentes, D., Gumpenberger, C., & Valderrama-Zurián, J. C. (2016). Availability of digital object identifiers (DOIs) in Web of Science and Scopus. Journal of Informetrics, 10(1), 98–109.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2015.11.008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Huang, M., & Liu, W. (2019). Large numbers of easily identifiable illegal DOI names still exist in Scopus. Working paper.Google Scholar
  7. Liu, W. (2017). The changing role of non-English papers in scholarly communication: Evidence from Web of Science’s three journal citation indexes. Learned Publishing, 30(2), 115–123.  https://doi.org/10.1002/leap.1089.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Liu, W., Hu, G., & Tang, L. (2018). Missing author address information in Web of Science—An explorative study. Journal of Informetrics, 12(3), 985–997.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2018.07.008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Tang, L., Hu, G., & Liu, W. (2017). Funding acknowledgment analysis: Queries and caveats. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(3), 790–794.  https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.23713.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Zhu, J., Hu, G., & Liu, W. (2019). DOI errors and possible solutions for Web of Science. Scientometrics, 118(2), 709–718.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-018-2980-7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.School of AccountingZhejiang University of Finance and EconomicsHangzhouChina
  3. 3.School of Information Management and EngineeringZhejiang University of Finance and EconomicsHangzhouChina

Personalised recommendations