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Synthesis, solar cell application, and biological study of vinyl substituted isophorone derivatives

  • Zehra Kozak
  • Selin Pıravadılı Mucur
  • Betül Canımkurbey
  • Önder İdil
  • Serpil Eryılmaz
  • Melek GulEmail author
Article
  • 52 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, isophorone derivatives, which are single step aldol products, were designed and synthesized. Our overview of the synthesis of solar cell application and biological applications of series vinyl substituted isophorone compounds is reported. All synthesized compounds were characterized both through experimental techniques and calculations with density functional theory. Additionally, we investigated the photophysical properties of small organic compounds for organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The solar cell efficiency results were compared and compound 4 was found to be more efficient than the other compounds. It was found that the optical quantum yield values were very close. Isophorone derivatives showed better antioxidant activities, which were DPPH, metal chelating, reducing activity, and antimicrobial activities against Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumonia, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli. Compound 7 (which is substituted quinoline) and compound 5 (which is substituted cyno) had the highest antioxidant effect. The 4-brom phenyl, 4-cyno phenyl were used against gram negative bacteria and the 4-ter-butyl phenyl group was indicated for gram positive bacteria and yeast.

Keywords

Aldol Isophorone Organic photovoltaics 

Notes

Supplementary material

11164_2019_3924_MOESM1_ESM.docx (1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 1055 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zehra Kozak
    • 1
  • Selin Pıravadılı Mucur
    • 2
  • Betül Canımkurbey
    • 3
    • 6
  • Önder İdil
    • 5
  • Serpil Eryılmaz
    • 4
  • Melek Gul
    • 1
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and SciencesAmasya UniversityAmasyaTurkey
  2. 2.Photonic Technologies LaboratoryTÜBİTAK MAM Material InstituteGebzeTurkey
  3. 3.S. Şerefeddin Health Services Vocational SchoolAmasya UniversityAmasyaTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and SciencesAmasya UniversityAmasyaTurkey
  5. 5.Department of Science Education, Faculty of EducationAmasya UniversityAmasyaTurkey
  6. 6.Central Research LaboratoryAmasya UniversityAmasyaTurkey

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