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Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis

, Volume 127, Issue 2, pp 1039–1058 | Cite as

Kinetic modeling of transesterification of gmelina seed oil catalyzed by alkaline activated clay (NaOH/clay) catalyst

  • Callistus N. UdeEmail author
  • Okechukwu D. Onukwuli
Article
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

The kinetic modeling of transesterification of gmelina seed oil, GSO catalyzed by alkaline activated clay catalyst was investigated. The catalyst synthesized by activating clay with sodium hydroxide was used to examine the distribution of transesterification products. The reaction was conducted at 8:1 methanol/oil molar ratio, 6 wt% catalyst concentration and agitation speed of 300 rpm, temperatures of 45, 50 and 55 °C with different time interval. The kinetics was studied using elementary reaction mechanism of Eley–Rideal (ER). The results obtained showed that the clay belongs to kaolinite group and alkaline activated clay catalyst, was able to convert GSO to biodiesel with significant changes in concentrations of the transesterification products and reactants between 0 and 2.5 h. The kinetic investigation revealed that the data fitted the Eley–Rideal (ER) kinetic model with surface reaction between non-adsorbed methanol and adsorbed triglyceride as rate determining step, the rate determining step occurring at a temperature of below boiling point of methanol. The activation energy and frequency factor for the forward reaction were determined to be 2.90 kJ/mol and 0.025 h−1, respectively. The predictive power of the developed model for RDS was checked by fitting experimental data and it revealed good correlation.

Keywords

Gmelina seed oil Clay Eley–Rideal Heterogeneous catalyst Sodium hydroxide 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Projects Development Institute (PRODA)Emene-EnuguNigeria
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringNnamdi Azikiwe University (NAU)AwkaNigeria

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