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Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 99, Issue 1–2, pp 161–174 | Cite as

ANAC019 is required for recovery of reproductive development under drought stress in Arabidopsis

  • Noor Liyana Sukiran
  • Julia C. Ma
  • Hong MaEmail author
  • Zhao SuEmail author
Article

Abstract

Key message

Morphological and transcriptomic evidences provide us strong support for the function of ANAC019 in reproductive development under drought stress.

Abstract

Plants are sensitive to drought conditions, particularly at the reproductive stage. Several studies have reported drought effects on crop reproductive development, but the molecular mechanism underlying drought response during reproduction is still unclear. A recent study showed that drought induces in Arabidopsis inflorescence increased expression of many genes, including ANAC019. However, the function of ANAC019 in drought response during reproductive development has not been characterized. Here, we report an investigation of the ANAC019 function in the response to drought during reproduction. ANAC019 is preferentially expressed in the inflorescence compared with the leaf, suggesting possible roles in regulating both stress response and flower development. The anac019 mutant was more sensitive to drought than WT plant, and exhibited a delay in recovery of floral organ development under prolonged drought stress. Moreover, many fewer genes were differentially expressed in the anac019 inflorescence under drought than that of WT, suggesting that the mutant was impaired in drought-induced gene expression. The genes affected by ANAC019 were associated with stress and hormone responses as well as floral development. In particular, the expression levels of several key drought-induced genes, DREB2A, DREB2B, ARF2, MYB21 and MYB24, were dramatically reduced in the absence of ANAC019, suggesting that ANAC019 is an upstream regulator these genes for drought response and flower development. These results provide strong support for the potential function of ANAC019 in reproductive development under drought stress.

Keywords

Reproductive development Drought Arabidopsis Transcriptome ANAC019 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We greatly appreciate the help of Dr Craig Praul of Genomics Core Facility for performing microarray hybridizations. We also express appreciation to Ms. Yi Hu for help with plant care.

Author Contributions

ZS and HM designed the research. NLS and JCM performed different aspects of the research. NLS, ZS and HM wrote the article.

Funding

This work was supported by a grant from the US Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-02ER15332) to H.M. and funds from Rijk Zwaan, the Biology Department and the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences at the Pennsylvania State University.

Supplementary material

11103_2018_810_MOESM1_ESM.docx (7.9 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 8055 KB)
11103_2018_810_MOESM2_ESM.xls (1.2 mb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLS 1195 KB)

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© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biology and the Huck Institutes of the Life SciencesThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.State College Area High SchoolState CollegeUSA
  3. 3.Center of Biotechnology and Functional Food, Faculty of Science and TechnologyUniversiti Kebangsaan MalaysiaBangiMalaysia

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