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Pituitary

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 552–560 | Cite as

Arthropathy in acromegaly: a questionnaire-based estimation of motor disability and its relation with quality of life and work productivity

  • L. M. Fatti
  • B. Cangiano
  • G. Vitale
  • L. Persani
  • G. Mantovani
  • E. Sala
  • M. Arosio
  • P. Maffei
  • F. Dassie
  • M. Mormando
  • A. Giampietro
  • L. Tanda
  • E. R. Masiello
  • E. Nazzari
  • D. Ferone
  • S. Corbetta
  • E. Passeri
  • F. Guaraldi
  • S. Grottoli
  • S. Cannavò
  • M. L. T. Torre
  • D. Soranna
  • A. Zambon
  • F. Cavagnini
  • M. ScacchiEmail author
  • The Study Group on Motor Disability in Acromegaly of the Italian Society of Endocrinology
Article
  • 110 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

Arthropathy is a common and disabling complication of acromegaly. Since in this condition radiological findings rarely correspond to functional impairment, we elected to quantify in a large cohort of acromegalic patients: the degree of motor disability compared with data from general population, the impact of joint involvement on quality of life and work productivity, and to look for associated factors.

Methods

In 211 acromegalic patients, 131 with controlled disease and 80 with active disease, eight validated scales were used to evaluate the (i) prevalence and distribution of arthropathy, (ii) degree of motor disability and joint symptoms (VAS, AIMS symptoms and WOMAC), (iii) quality of life (AcroQoL and PASQ) and work capability (WPAI:GH) as consequences of joint complications.

Results

Using the WOMAC questionnaire, for which population based normative values are available, a significantly higher prevalence and severity of motor disability was detected in acromegalics compared to the general population from literature. The results provided by the different questionnaires turned out to be highly concordant. All measures of motor disability correlated both with impaired quality of life and motor disability and were worse in females and in patients with higher BMI.

Conclusions

The questionnaires VAS, AIMS symptoms, and WOMAC (this latter both as a whole and with its functionality subscale), with their scores, proved to be the most adequate tools to evaluate motor disability and its consequences on both quality of life and work productivity in acromegaly. Female gender and higher BMI are associated with worse articular symptoms.

Keywords

Acromegaly Osteoarthritis Articular impairment Rehabilitation Gender Complication 

Notes

Funding

This research did not receive any specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sector.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest that could be perceived as prejudicing the impartiality of the research reported

Ethical approval and informed consent

The study was conducted in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The study was approved by the Ethic Committee of the coordinating institution (GR-2008-1137632), and all patients gave a written informed consent.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. M. Fatti
    • 1
  • B. Cangiano
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Vitale
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Persani
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Mantovani
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. Sala
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. Arosio
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. Maffei
    • 4
  • F. Dassie
    • 4
  • M. Mormando
    • 5
  • A. Giampietro
    • 5
  • L. Tanda
    • 6
  • E. R. Masiello
    • 6
  • E. Nazzari
    • 7
  • D. Ferone
    • 7
  • S. Corbetta
    • 8
    • 9
  • E. Passeri
    • 9
  • F. Guaraldi
    • 10
  • S. Grottoli
    • 11
  • S. Cannavò
    • 12
    • 13
  • M. L. T. Torre
    • 12
  • D. Soranna
    • 14
  • A. Zambon
    • 15
  • F. Cavagnini
    • 16
  • M. Scacchi
    • 2
    • 17
    Email author
  • The Study Group on Motor Disability in Acromegaly of the Italian Society of Endocrinology
  1. 1.Division of Endocrine and Metabolic DiseasesIstituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCSMilanItaly
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Sciences and Community HealthUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  3. 3.Endocrine UnitFondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore PoliclinicoMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of Medicine-DIMEDUniversity of PaduaPaduaItaly
  5. 5.Pituitary Unit, Section of Endocrinology, Department of Internal MedicineCatholic University, ‘A. Gemelli’ University HospitalRomeItaly
  6. 6.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversity of InsubriaVareseItaly
  7. 7.Endocrinology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical SpecialtiesIRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, University of GenoaGenoaItaly
  8. 8.Department of Biomedical Sciences for HealthUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  9. 9.Endocrinology and Diabetology ServiceIRCCS Istituto Ortopedico GaleazziMilanItaly
  10. 10.Pituitary Unit, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences of BolognaUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  11. 11.Department of Medical SciencesUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  12. 12.Department of Human PathologyUniversity of MessinaMessinaItaly
  13. 13.Endocrine UnitUniversity Hospital of MessinaMessinaItaly
  14. 14.Istituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCSMilanItaly
  15. 15.Division of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Statistics and Quantitative MethodsUniversity of Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly
  16. 16.Istituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCS, Center for Biomedical Research and TechnologyMilanItaly
  17. 17.Division of General MedicineIstituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCSLocalità PiancavalloItaly

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