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International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 747–748 | Cite as

Letter: Medication administration via enteral feeding tube

  • Lucien RouletEmail author
  • Emmanuel Benoit
Letter to the Editor

To the editor:

Joos et al. [1] recently published the results of an observational study investigating the community pharmacists’ knowledge on current international guidelines for medication administration through an enteral feeding tube (EFT). This evaluation was based on a 15-item self-administered questionnaire reflecting the key aspects of guideline recommendations on medication administration via EFT. The authors concluded that community pharmacists had insufficient required knowledge to provide good advice to EFT patients or their caregivers.

Despite the constant increase in the use of EFT for drug administration, drug product licences still provide little data on this subject. Healthcare professionals are thus obliged to find information on their own and administrate drugs via EFT under their own responsibility [2]. In this context, we appreciate the effort of the authors to address this issue and contribute to the dissemination of good practices. Nevertheless, based on our...

Keywords

Enteral Nutrition Mycophenolate Mofetil Community Pharmacist Levothyroxine Medication Administration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Funding

None.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare they have no conflicts of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Joos E, Verbeke S, Mehuys E, Van Bocxlaer J, Remon JP, Van Winckel M, et al. Medication administration via enteral feeding tube: a survey of pharmacists’ knowledge. Int J Clin Pharm. 2016;38(1):10–5.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    White R, Bradnam V. Handbook of drug administration via enteral feeding tubes. 3rd ed. London: Pharmaceutical Press; 2015. ISBN 978-0-85711-162-3.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2014. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2014-138. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2014-138/pdfs/2014-138_v3.pdf. Accessed 16 Feb 2016.
  4. 4.
    Kaestli LZ, Fonzo-Christe C, Bonfillon C, Desmeules J, Bonnabry P. Eur J Hosp Pharm. 2013;20:100–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy, Pharmacie ICHHôpital Du ValaisSionSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of PharmacyPHNVBYverdon-les-BainsSwitzerland

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