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International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 327–331 | Cite as

Drug-related problems found in children attending an emergency department in Saudi Arabia and in the United Kingdom

  • Asia N. RashedEmail author
  • Antje Neubert
  • Hani Alhamdan
  • Stephen Tomlin
  • Aeshah Alazmi
  • Adnan AlShaikh
  • Lynda Wilton
  • Ian C. K. Wong
Short Research Report

Abstract

Background No published studies investigating drug-related problems (DRPs) in children visiting emergency department (ED) in either the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) or the United Kingdom (UK) were identified. Objective To determine the frequency and characteristics of DRPs in paediatric patients attending ED in the KSA and the UK. Method An observational study. DRPs were identified by a researcher, reviewing the medical records of children attending the ED during a three-month period in KSA and a 1 month period in UK; severity and preventability of the DRPs were assessed. Incidence of DRPs overall and in each country was calculated. Results A total of 253 patients (KSA n = 143, UK n = 110) were included. Fifty-five patients (22 %; 55/253), experienced 69 DRPs. 2 % (5/253) of the patients attended the ED due to DRPs. Overall incidence was 21.7 % (95 % CI, 16.8–27.3). 78 % (54/69) of the DRPs were assessed as preventable; 33 % (23/69) as of moderate severity. Conclusion DRPs were common in paediatric patients attending EDs; the majority were preventable. Further study is needed to investigate the impact of mild and moderate DRPs on paediatric patients’ health and also to improve the care provided to minimise the occurrence of preventable DRPs.

Keywords

Drug-related problems Emergency department Paediatrics Saudi Arabia United Kingdom 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Dr Ahmed Attar at KSA site and Dr John Jackman at the UK site for their help with study implementation and data assessment. Asia Rashed was funded by the Yamani Cultural and Charitable Foundation, London, United Kingdom.

Funding

The study in the UK was funded by Neonatal and Paediatric Pharmacists Group (NPPG) Man-Med award 2009.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Asia N. Rashed
    • 1
    Email author
  • Antje Neubert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hani Alhamdan
    • 3
  • Stephen Tomlin
    • 4
  • Aeshah Alazmi
    • 3
  • Adnan AlShaikh
    • 3
  • Lynda Wilton
    • 1
  • Ian C. K. Wong
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Centre for Paediatric Pharmacy ResearchUCL School of PharmacyLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Paediatric and Adolescent MedicineFAU Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany
  3. 3.National Guard Health AffairsKind Abdul-Aziz Medical City-JeddahJeddahSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Evelina London Children’s Hospital, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation TrustKing’s Health PartnersLondonUK
  5. 5.Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of MedicineThe University of Hong KongHong KongPeople’s Republic of China

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