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Pharmacy World & Science

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 347–349 | Cite as

Substitution of corticosteroid with everolimus after lung transplantation: a pediatric case report

  • Thibaut CarubaEmail author
  • Vanida Brunie
  • Véronique Bousseau
  • Romain Guillemain
  • Patrice Prognon
  • Dominique Bégué
  • Brigitte Sabatier
Case Report

Abstract

We report the case of a 12 year-old lung transplant recipient, in whom compressive epidural lipomatosis secondary to corticosteroid prompted us to replace prednisone with everolimus. Discontinuing corticosteroid treatment after lung transplantation is associated with a risk of graft rejection despite concomitant immunosuppressive therapy with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. During a follow-up of 18 months with everolimus instead of prednisone, we did not observe graft rejection. In parallel, all symptoms related to epidural compression disappeared within a month.

Keywords

Lung transplantation Pediatric Everolimus Corticosteroids withdrawal Immunosuppressive therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thibaut Caruba
    • 1
    Email author
  • Vanida Brunie
    • 1
  • Véronique Bousseau
    • 2
  • Romain Guillemain
    • 2
  • Patrice Prognon
    • 1
  • Dominique Bégué
    • 3
  • Brigitte Sabatier
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmacy DepartmentHopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisParisFrance
  2. 2.Cardiovascular Surgery DepartmentHopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisParisFrance
  3. 3.Pharmacy department, Université Paris DescartesHopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisParisFrance

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