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Pharmacy World & Science

, 31:607 | Cite as

Written medicine information in Australia

  • Parisa AslaniEmail author
Letter to the Editor

To the Editor:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the short research report by Vitry et al. (Vol 31; pp. 154–157). There has been considerable publicity created by this article in Australia, primarily because of the data published on the provision of Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) by community pharmacists. As a researcher in this area, I was concerned at the article’s content, specifically at the lack of referencing to the research on CMI and Package Insert Leaflets (PILs) (e.g. [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]), and the limited information on the methods used. Whilst I appreciate that the article was a short research communication and bound by the Journal’s guidelines, I felt that important information had been compromised by the authors.

The authors have not reported on other studies which have examined the provision and use of CMI by community pharmacists in Australia [1, 3], nor have they compared their findings to those studies. Historical comparisons are important in light of the...

Keywords

Community Pharmacy Community Pharmacist Package Insert Hospital Pharmacist Medicine Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Aslani P, Benrimoj S, Krass I. Use of CMI by NSW community pharmacists—a baseline study. Aust Pharm. 1998;17:15–20.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Koo M, Krass I, Aslani P. Patient characteristics influencing evaluation of written medicine information: lessons for patient education. Ann Pharmacother. 2005;39:1434–40.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Koo M, Krass I, Aslani P. Consumer use of consumer medicine information. J Pharm Pract Res. 2005;35(2):94–8.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Koo M, Krass I, Aslani P. Enhancing patient education about medicines: factors influencing reading and seeking of written medicine information. Health Expect. 2006;9:174–87.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Raynor D, Knapp P. Do patients see, read and retain the new mandatory medicines information leaflets? Pharm J. 2000;264:268–70.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of PharmacyThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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