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Pharmacy World & Science

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 18–23 | Cite as

Pharmacological differences between once daily and twice daily gentamicin dosage in newborns with suspected sepsis

  • Inge HagenEmail author
  • Knut Øymar
Research Article

Abstract

Objective To evaluate two different regimens for gentamicin administration (once or twice daily) in newborns with suspected sepsis, and the ability of these regimens to achieve recommended serum gentamicin concentrations (SGC) within the therapeutic range. Setting Neonatal intensive care unit. Method We conducted a retrospective study of newborns ≥34 weeks gestational age (GA) admitted with suspected sepsis to the neonatal unit at Stavanger University Hospital from 1st February 2003 to 31st May 2005. During the first period patients received gentamicin 2.5 mg/kg twice daily (n = 62) and during the last period patients received gentamicin 4 mg/kg once daily (n = 73). In both groups, levels of gentamicin were obtained before and after the third given dose. Results Mean peak levels were lower and mean trough levels were higher in the twice daily regimen compared to the once daily regimen (P < 0.001 for both). About 16 newborns in the twice daily regimen had trough levels higher than the recommended level (<2 μg/ml) compared to two children in the once daily regimen (P < 0.001). High peak levels (>10 μg/ml) were achieved in one child in the twice daily regimen compared to eight children in the once daily regimen (P = 0.04). The number of children with a low peak level (<5 μg/ml) was only three and one respectively (n.s). Conclusion In newborns with suspected sepsis, gentamicin 4 mg/kg once daily provided higher peak and lower trough gentamicin levels compared to administering gentamicin 2.5 mg twice daily.

Keywords

Dosage Gewntamycin Newborns Sepsis 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We thank Øyvind Skadberg for advises regarding laboratory analyses, Nina Hapnes for language revision and Jan Terje Kvaløy for figure drawing.

Conflict of interest

None.

Funding

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsStavanger University HospitalStavangerNorway
  2. 2.Department of Clinical MedicineUniversity of BergenBergenNorway

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