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Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 13–15 | Cite as

Withdrawal symptom after discontinuation of transdermal fentanyl at a daily dose of 0.6 mg

  • Chie Ishihara
  • Hiroki KonishiEmail author
  • Mikio Chiba
  • Tokuzo Minouchi
  • Yoshihiro Endo
  • Akira Yamaji
Article

Abstract

Neurophysiologic disorders developed in three patients after discontinuation of transdermal fentanyl (TDF) at a daily dose of 0.6 mg (2.5 mg per a patch), although direct removal of a 2.5 mg patch is permitted by the manufacturer as the formulation has the lowest fentanyl content among all the commercially available patch formulations. These observations indicate that the discontinuation of TDF carries a risk for developing withdrawal symptoms even when using a 2.5 mg patch. To avoid such adverse events, we considered the necessity of gradual reduction in the daily fentanyl requirements. For this purpose, we covered part of the application surface of the patch with an insulating tape, and then increased the covered area in a stepwise manner. There were no apparent withdrawal signs during the procedure described above.

Keywords

Pain control Transdermal fentanyl Withdrawal symptom 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chie Ishihara
    • 1
  • Hiroki Konishi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mikio Chiba
    • 1
  • Tokuzo Minouchi
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Endo
    • 2
  • Akira Yamaji
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Hospital PharmacyShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan

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