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Assessment and zonation of storm surge hazards in the coastal areas of China

  • Shi Xianwu
  • Han Ziqiang
  • Fang Jiayi
  • Tan Jun
  • Guo Zhixing
  • Sun ZhilinEmail author
Original Paper
  • 60 Downloads

Abstract

Storm surge is one of the most devastating marine disasters in China, leading to tremendous economic damage and a large number of casualties. Combined storm surge hazard assessment and zonation is an important method for coastal disaster risk reduction and mitigation management. Based on observational data from tide-gauge and hydrological stations in coastal areas, we analyzed storm surge hazard intensity and generated a storm surge hazard map at the county level using the expected values of storm surge and over-warning water levels. The results show that 87, 67, 62, and 40 counties along the coast of China are exposed to the first (highest), second (higher), third (medium), and fourth (low) degree of hazard level, respectively. The areas with the highest risk of storm surge are the coasts of Bohai Bay, Laizhou Bay, and the Yangtze Delta, the coast from the north of Fuzhou to the south of Zhejiang, and the coastal area of Huizhou, Pearl River, and Yangjiang in Guangdong Province. This assessment, which is based on a national storm surge hazards map, can provide decision-making support for the government’s urban planning of coastal cities and site selection in large national projects.

Keywords

Storm surge Over-warning water level Expected value analysis Hazards map 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41701596) and the National Marine Public Industry Research Project (201305020 and 201505018). We are thankful to the National Oceanic Information Center for providing some tide-gauge observational data.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shi Xianwu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Han Ziqiang
    • 3
  • Fang Jiayi
    • 4
  • Tan Jun
    • 2
  • Guo Zhixing
    • 2
  • Sun Zhilin
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Zhejiang UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.National Hazard Marine Mitigation ServiceBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.School of Political Science and Public AdministrationShandong UniversityQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.School of Geographic SciencesEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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