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The Problem of Free Will in the Context of Neuroscience Research

  • D. N. RazeevEmail author
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This paper provides a critical discussion of two experiments which have been termed free will experiments conducted by scientists working in the field of cognitive psychology and neurosciences in recent decades. The author proposes two conceptual objections to the conclusion that these experiments demonstrate the absence of free will in humans.

Keywords

Libet’s experiment Soon’s experiment the “veto” principle free will freedom of action 

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References

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of the Philosophy of Science and TechnologySt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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