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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 136–141 | Cite as

Anxiolytic and Antidepressant Actions of Emoxypine, Reamberin, and Mexidol in Experimental Diabetes Mellitus

  • I. A. Volchegorskii
  • I. Yu. Miroshnichenko
  • L. M. Rassokhina
  • R. M. Faizullin
  • K. E. Pryakhina
Article

Objectives. To conduct a comparative study of the anxiolytic and antidepressant activities of derivatives of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid (emoxypine, Reamberin, and Mexidol) in experimental diabetes mellitus (DM). Materials and methods. The effects of emoxypine, Reamberin, and Mexidol on the signs of anxiety in an elevated plus maze and the duration of “despair” behavior in the Porsolt test were assessed in rats with alloxan diabetes during courses of drug treatment. The reference agent was α-lipoic acid. An additional series of experiments was run to study the effects of emoxypine, Reamberin, Mexidol and α-lipoic acid on the severity of hyperglycemia in experimental DM. Results and conclusions. All study drugs were used at doses equivalent to the human therapeutic range for 14 days and significantly decreased the signs of anxiety and depression in rats with alloxan diabetes. The most marked anxiolytic potential was demonstrated for emoxypine, which was the only one of the study drugs decreasing the signs of anxiety not only in comparison with the alloxan diabetes control group, but also relative to the intact control group. Derivatives of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid were no less effective than α-lipoic acid in terms of the level of tranquilizing activity and were more effective than α-lipoic acid in terms of thymoanaleptic activity when given at the maximal dose to rats with experimental DM. Emoxypine and Mexidol, and also α-lipoic acid, significantly decreased hyperglycemia in alloxan diabetes at all the doses tested. Reamberin displayed only minor trends in this direction.

Keywords

derivatives of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid experimental diabetes mellitus anxiety depression hyperglycemia 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. A. Volchegorskii
    • 1
  • I. Yu. Miroshnichenko
    • 1
  • L. M. Rassokhina
    • 1
  • R. M. Faizullin
    • 1
  • K. E. Pryakhina
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, South Ural State Medical UniversityRussian Federation Ministry of HealthChelyabinskRussia

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