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Multimedia Tools and Applications

, Volume 78, Issue 22, pp 32261–32305 | Cite as

Developing pervasive games in interactive spaces: the JUGUEMOS toolkit

  • Clara BonilloEmail author
  • Javier Marco
  • Eva Cerezo
Article
  • 30 Downloads

Abstract

The progress in the development of pervasive games is slowing down because of the multiple challenges that these games brings to developers, due to the great variety of interaction paradigms that this kind of games involve and the difficulties of developing applications where so many innovative technologies converge. In this article we present JUGUEMOS, a toolkit aimed at developers to help them in the creation of pervasive games for Interactive Spaces. The toolkit addresses three challenges that arise when developing pervasive games: the integration of heterogeneous devices, the management of multiple displays and the facilitation of the game coding. The toolkit is based on the TUIML modeling language that allows defining games easily, reducing the impact of the coding between iterations. The toolkit also makes use of the OSC Protocol to interconnect the different devices. Detailed descriptions of the toolkit design decisions, architecture and implementation are presented, together with three different case studies carried out in order to explore the toolkit expressivity, its capability to support collaborative multidisciplinary experiences, and its potential to support interactive experiences outside our Interactive Space. We hope this work would contribute to the spread of pervasive games in interactive spaces.

Keywords

Pervasive games Interactive spaces Toolkits TUIML 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We want to thank Belén Cebrián, Alejandro Navarro, the students and tutors of the School of Arts of Plymouth, the students and tutors of the EINA, the ESDA staff, and the Cesar-Etopía laboratories, for making this work possible. This work has been partly financed by the Spanish Government and the European Union through the contract TIN2015-67149-C3-1R (MINECO/ FEDER) and by the Aragonese Government and the European Union through the FEDER 2014-2020 “Construyendo Europa desde Aragón” action (Group T25_17D).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Advanced Interfaces Group (AffectiveLab), Computer Science DepartmentUniversidad de ZaragozaZaragozaSpain
  2. 2.Escuela Superior de Diseño de Aragón (ESDA)ZaragozaSpain
  3. 3.Advanced Interfaces Group (AffectiveLab), Computer Science Department, Engineering Research Institute of Aragon (I3A)Universidad de ZaragozaZaragozaSpain

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