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Multi-criteria Mapping of Stakeholders’ Viewpoints in Five Southeast Asian Countries on Strategies to Reduce Micronutrient Deficiencies Among Children and Women of Reproductive Age: Findings from the SMILING Project

  • Valerie Greffeuille
  • Yves Kameli
  • Chhoun Chamnan
  • Mary Chea
  • Sok Daream
  • Pattanee Winichagoon
  • Chaniphun Butryee
  • Bach Mai Le
  • Tran Thi Lua
  • Siti Muslimatum
  • Airin Roshita
  • Sengchanh Kounnavong
  • Frank T. Wieringa
  • Jacques Berger
Article

Abstract

Background

Despite scientific evidence on the potential impact or importance of specific interventions to improve micronutrient status of vulnerable groups, political commitment and extensive support from national stakeholders is paramount to support introduction and implementation of these interventions at national level. In order to develop efficient nutritional strategies to improve the micronutrient status of children < 5 years of age and women of reproductive age that will be supported by a wide range of stakeholders, a better understanding of viewpoints on the nutrition politics and strategies is necessary. Multi-criteria mapping (MCM) was successfully used to assess the stakeholder’s viewpoint in a wide variety of contexts since the late 1990s.

Objective

The objective of the present study was to assess the viewpoints of stakeholders on a wide range of potential nutritional interventions in the five Southeast Asian countries participating in the SMILING project.

Method

MCM methodology was used to appraise the stakeholder’s viewpoints in five countries.

Results

The results show that the overall stakeholders’ preference was for actions already implemented in their country rather than for new, innovative options, even for supplementation. Indirect interventions such like food fortification (except in Indonesia), delayed cord clamping or food-based approaches were generally less favored by the stakeholders. However, the majority of stakeholders agreed that new approaches should be considered and put in place in the future provided that evidence of their impact was demonstrated, that they received adequate technical support for their implementation and their monitoring, and that they will be accompanied by strong advocacy among decision-makers, civil society and beneficiaries.

Conclusions for practice

To conclude, for the introduction of new, innovative strategies to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in South-East Asia, convincing stakeholders appears to be the first hurdle to be taken.

Keywords

Nutrition policies Children Women of reproductive age Stakeholder Multi-criteria mapping Micronutrient deficiencies Southeast Asia Fortification 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie Greffeuille
    • 1
  • Yves Kameli
    • 1
  • Chhoun Chamnan
    • 2
  • Mary Chea
    • 3
  • Sok Daream
    • 2
  • Pattanee Winichagoon
    • 4
  • Chaniphun Butryee
    • 4
  • Bach Mai Le
    • 5
  • Tran Thi Lua
    • 5
  • Siti Muslimatum
    • 6
  • Airin Roshita
    • 6
  • Sengchanh Kounnavong
    • 7
  • Frank T. Wieringa
    • 1
  • Jacques Berger
    • 1
  1. 1.UMR-204 Nutripass, French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD), IRD/UM/SupAgroMontpellierFrance
  2. 2.DFPTQ - The Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality ControlMinistry of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesPhnom PenhCambodia
  3. 3.NMCHC - National Maternal and Child Health CenterMinistry of HealthPhnom PenhCambodia
  4. 4.Institute of NutritionMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  5. 5.NIN - National Institute of NutritionMinistry of HealthHanoiVietnam
  6. 6.SEAMEO RECFON - South East Asian Ministers of Education Organization, Regional Centre for Food and NutritionJakartaIndonesia
  7. 7.NIOPH - National Institute of Public HealthMinistry of HealthVientianeLao People’s Democratic Republic

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