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Characterizations of high-activity solid deposit samples from fission products tanks

  • Steve JanEmail author
  • Pierre Sarrat
  • Fabrice Bouchet
  • Eric Cantrel
  • Bénédicte Arab-Chapelet
  • Cédric Rivier
Article
  • 4 Downloads

Abstract

For dismantling the UP1 reprocessing plant in Marcoule, deposits coming from fission products tanks and evaporators have been characterized in the Atalante facility laboratories and hot cells. Very specific analytical developments have been performed, such as selective Cs decontamination by extraction chromatography and direct analysis of solid residues by L-line XRF. The dissolution process optimizations have resulted in final dissolution residues which dose rate do not exceed 0.1% of the initial aliquot dose rate. These characterizations help determining the composition of the raffinates present in such reprocessing equipment. These data are essential for the definition of remediation scenarios and waste management.

Keywords

Characterization Decommissioning Fission products Dismantling Dissolution 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thanks to all the contributors who have taken part of this work, especially Atalante facility experimenters and on-site sampling workers. We are grateful to Dr. S. Baghdadi (IRSN/PSNEXP/SSRD/BTE) for her precious advice on the present paper.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Department on Mining and Fuel Recycling ProcessesUniversity of MontpellierMarcouleFrance
  2. 2.CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Dismantling Division for Civilian ApplicationsUniversity of MontpellierMarcouleFrance

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