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Comparative cell uptake study of FITC-/177Lu-labeled RM26 monomer, dimer and trimer on PC-3: improving binding affinity of gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist via bivalency/trivalency

  • Liangang Zhuo
  • Xia Yang
  • Wei Liao
  • Jing Wang
  • Hailin Wang
  • Minli Lv
  • Guanquan Wang
  • Hu Song
  • Yue Feng
  • Yue Chen
  • Hongyuan Wei
  • Yuchuan Yang
  • Peng ZhaoEmail author
Article
  • 62 Downloads

Abstract

The gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRPRs) overexpress in various tumors, which provided the opportunity for GRPR targeted tumor radiological diagnosis and therapy. In recent reports, the GPPR antagonists presented superior specific targeting affinity over the agonists. However, antagonists suffer from many shortcomings regarding their binding affinity and biodistribution properties. In this study, we designed the dimer/trimer antagonists to address the radiotherapy requirements. The results showed both of dimer and trimer RM26 derivatives appeared a progressive improvement. This study provided an efficient strategy to improve the tumor accumulation properties for the GRPR antagonist analogs.

Keywords

RM26 peptide GRPR antagonist 177Lu Peptide multimerization 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21502178 and 21701155).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liangang Zhuo
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Xia Yang
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Wei Liao
    • 1
    • 4
  • Jing Wang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Hailin Wang
    • 1
  • Minli Lv
    • 2
    • 4
  • Guanquan Wang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Hu Song
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yue Feng
    • 2
    • 4
  • Yue Chen
    • 2
    • 4
  • Hongyuan Wei
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yuchuan Yang
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Peng Zhao
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry (INPC)China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP)MianyangPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Nuclear MedicineThe Affiliated Hospital Southwest of Medical UniversityLuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of JiangsuHigher Education InstitutionsSuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Sichuan ProvinceMianyangPeople’s Republic of China

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