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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 48, Issue 11, pp 2323–2325 | Cite as

Megan MacCutcheon: The Ultimate Self-Esteem Workbook for Teens

Rockridge Press, Emeryville, CA, 2019, 156 pp, ISBN: 978-1-64152-610-4
  • Chris FradkinEmail author
Book Review
  • 25 Downloads

In The Ultimate Self-Esteem Workbook for Teens, author Megan MacCutcheon delivers a self-help workbook for teens struggling with their self-esteem. This developmental stage is a critical time for intervention, as teens with lower self-esteem have “poorer mental and physical health, worse economic prospects, and higher levels of criminal behavior in adulthood” than their peers with healthy self-esteem (Trzesniewski et al. 2006, p. 381). The author includes activities, tutorials, and anecdotes from former patients, to help the reader on the road to their recovery. The author encourages the teen to work the book at their own pace; she posits that progress is a process (MacCutcheon 2019). Thus, the workbook is a guidebook, to assist the troubled teen on their path from childhood to adulthood.

The workbook is divided into three parts, with 23 mini-chapters. Part 1 explains what self-esteem is and how teens try to cope with uncomfortable emotions. Part 2 provides exercises to bolster...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CaliforniaMercedUSA
  2. 2.Universidade Salgado de OliveiraNiteróiBrasil

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