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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 835–836 | Cite as

Correction to: Age Patterns in Risk Taking Across the World

  • Natasha DuellEmail author
  • Laurence Steinberg
  • Grace Icenogle
  • Jason Chein
  • Nandita Chaudhary
  • Laura Di Giunta
  • Kenneth A. Dodge
  • Kostas A. Fanti
  • Jennifer E. Lansford
  • Paul Oburu
  • Concetta Pastorelli
  • Ann T. Skinner
  • Emma Sorbring
  • Sombat Tapanya
  • Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
  • Liane Peña Alampay
  • Suha M. Al-Hassan
  • Hanan M. S. Takash
  • Dario Bacchini
  • Lei Chang
Correction
  • 198 Downloads

Correction to:Journal of Youth Adolescence (2018) 47(5):1052–1072

 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0752-y

In the original publication, the legends for Figs 4 and 5 were incorrect, such that each regression line was mislabeled with the incorrect country. Below are the correctly labeled countries. The authors apologize for any confusion or misinformation this error may have caused.
Fig. 4

Age patterns in self-reported health risk taking across countries. Values are percentage (%) of health risks (drinking alcohol, getting in the car with a drunk driver, smoking cigarettes, and having unprotected sex) endorsed. Slopes represent estimated regression coefficients (centered at the slope for 10-year-olds) for age and age2 adjusted for gender, parental education, and intellectual ability. The model was estimated separately for each country. *Countries for which there was a significant quadratic effect of age

Fig. 5

Age patterns in self-reported antisocial risk taking across countries. Values are percentage (%) of antisocial risks (vandalizing, stealing, fighting, walking through a dangerous neighborhood, and threatening someone) endorsed. Slopes represent estimated regression coefficients (centered at the slope 10-year-olds) for age and age2 adjusted for gender, parental education, and intellectual ability. The model was estimated separately for each country. *Countries for which there was a significant quadratic effect of age. **The quadratic effect is significant for females, but not males

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natasha Duell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Laurence Steinberg
    • 2
  • Grace Icenogle
    • 1
  • Jason Chein
    • 1
  • Nandita Chaudhary
    • 3
  • Laura Di Giunta
    • 4
  • Kenneth A. Dodge
    • 5
  • Kostas A. Fanti
    • 6
  • Jennifer E. Lansford
    • 5
  • Paul Oburu
    • 7
  • Concetta Pastorelli
    • 4
  • Ann T. Skinner
    • 5
  • Emma Sorbring
    • 8
  • Sombat Tapanya
    • 9
  • Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
    • 10
  • Liane Peña Alampay
    • 11
  • Suha M. Al-Hassan
    • 12
  • Hanan M. S. Takash
    • 13
  • Dario Bacchini
    • 14
  • Lei Chang
    • 15
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyTemple University and King Abdulaziz UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin CollegeUniversity of DelhiNew DelhiIndia
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversità di Roma “La Sapienza”RomaItaly
  5. 5.Center for Child and Family PolicyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CyprusKallipoleosCyprus
  7. 7.Department of Educational PsychologyMaseno UniversityMasenoKenya
  8. 8.Department of PsychologyUniversity WestTrollhättanSweden
  9. 9.Department of PsychiatryChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  10. 10.Consultorio Psicológico PopularUniversidad San BuenaventuraMedellínColombia
  11. 11.Department of PsychologyAteneo de Manila UniversityMetro ManilaPhilippines
  12. 12.Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced EducationAl ZafranahUnited Arab Emirates
  13. 13.Queen Rania Faculty for ChildhoodHashemite UniversityZarqaJordan
  14. 14.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”CasertaItaly
  15. 15.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MacauZhuhai ShiChina

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