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Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 58, Issue 6, pp 2086–2094 | Cite as

Staff Perceptions of Chaplains in a Neurosciences Critical Care Unit

  • Taylor E. PurvisEmail author
  • Brittany Powell
  • Gail Biba
  • Deena Conti
  • Thomas Y. Crowe
  • Heather Thomas
  • J. Ricardo Carhuapoma
  • John Probasco
  • Paula Teague
  • Deanna Saylor
Original Paper
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Hospital chaplains often visit critically ill patients, but neurosciences critical care unit (NCCU) staff beliefs surrounding chaplains have not been characterized. In this study, we used Qualtrics® to survey 70 NCCU healthcare workers about their attitudes toward chaplains in the NCCU. Chaplains were seen positively by staff but were less likely to be viewed as part of the care team by staff with more than five years of NCCU experience. The results of this study will allow chaplaincy programs to target staff education efforts in order to enhance the care provided to patients in critical care settings.

Keywords

Chaplain Critical care Neurologic critical care Staff Nurses 

Notes

Funding

Partial research funding was provided through an American Academy of Neurology Grant.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors TEP, BP, GB, DC, TYC, HT, JRC, JP, PT, and DS declare no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. However, full ethical approval was not obtained for this study. Rather, the IRB granted an exemption for this study because no identifying information was collected about participants, and the survey administered was deemed to be of minimal risk to participants. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

General Disclosures Unrelated to the Present Work

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s). Partial research funding was provided through an American Academy of Neurology grant. Portions of this work have been presented at the 2018 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was not required by the IRB given the exempt nature of this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taylor E. Purvis
    • 1
    Email author
  • Brittany Powell
    • 2
  • Gail Biba
    • 2
  • Deena Conti
    • 2
  • Thomas Y. Crowe
    • 2
  • Heather Thomas
    • 1
  • J. Ricardo Carhuapoma
    • 1
  • John Probasco
    • 1
  • Paula Teague
    • 2
  • Deanna Saylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Spiritual Care and ChaplaincyJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA

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