Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 57, Issue 3, pp 1179–1182 | Cite as

Complimentary Care: When Our Patients Request to Pray

Philosophical Exploration
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Abstract

Prayer is viewed in modern medicine as a complimentary alternative treatment. However, to many patients, it is a source of hope and comfort. Patients, when facing illness, advanced disease, disability or death, can benefit from prayer. For healthcare providers, comfort with praying with patients can be deemed as unprofessional conduct or blurred therapeutic boundaries, particularly, when prayer is offered to patients’ unsolicited by the patient or their family member(s). Therefore, it is imperative that healthcare providers await the request of prayer by the patient before prayer is initiated.

Keywords

Prayer Patients Nurses Healthcare providers 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Southern Connecticut State UniversityNew HavenUSA

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