Advertisement

The Protective Role of Rational Beliefs on the Relationship Between Irrational Beliefs, Emotional States of Stress, Depression and Anxiety

  • Murat BalkısEmail author
  • Erdinç Duru
Article

Abstract

The current study focuses on the protective role of rational beliefs in the relationship between irrational beliefs and negative emotional states (stress, depression and anxiety) in a sample of Turkish undergraduate students (N = 440). The findings suggest that irrational beliefs, especially the need for achievement, the need for approval, and the need for comfort, are important predictors of negative emotional states (stress, depression, and anxiety). The findings also provide additional evidence for the protective role of rational beliefs. Findings suggest that rational beliefs have a moderator role in the relationship between irrational beliefs and negative emotional states (stress, depression and anxiety). Contributions and the implications of this study were discussed in detail.

Keywords

Protective role of rational beliefs Irrational beliefs Emotional states of stress Depression and anxiety 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of Social and Human Sciences Research and Publication Ethics Committee of Pamukkale University (Approval Number: 68282350/2007/G05).

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from each participant.

References

  1. Bernard, M. E. (1990, June). Validation of General Attitude and Belief Scale. Presented at the World Congress of Mental Health Counselling, Keystone, CO.Google Scholar
  2. Bernard, M. E. (1998). Validation of General Attitude and Belief Scale. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 16, 183–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bilgel, N., & Bayram, N. (2010). Turkish version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-42): Psychometric properties. Archives of Neuropsychiatry/Nöropsikiatri Arşivi, 47(2), 118–126.Google Scholar
  4. Burgess, P. (1986). Belief systems and emotional disturbance: Evaluation of the rational emotive model. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
  5. Caserta, D. A., Dowd, E. T., David, D., & Ellis, A. (2010). Rational and irrational beliefs in primary prevention and mental health. In D. David, S. J. Lynn, & A. Ellis (Eds.), Rational and irrational beliefs: Research, theory and clinical practice (pp. 173–194). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Chamberlain, J. M., & Haaga, D. A. (2001). Unconditional self-acceptance and responses to negative feedback. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 19(3), 177–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Chang, E. C., & D’Zurilla, T. J. (1996). Irrational beliefs as predictors of anxiety and depression in a college population. Personality and Individual Differences, 20(2), 215–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  9. Culhane, S. E., & Watson, P. J. (2003). Alexithymia, irrational beliefs, and the rational-emotive explanation of emotional disturbance. Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 21, 57–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. David, D., Lynn, S. J., & Ellis, A. (2010). The role of rational and irrational beliefs in human functioning and disturbances: Implications for research, theory, and clinical practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. David, D., Montgomery, G. H., Macavei, B., & Bovbjerg, D. H. (2005). An empirical investigation of Albert Ellis’s binary model of distress. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 61(4), 499–516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. DiGiuseppe, R., Leaf, R., Exner, T., & Robin, M. V. (1988, September). The development of a measure of rational/irrational thinking. Paper presented at the World Congress of Behavior Therapy, Edinburgh, Scotland.Google Scholar
  13. DiGiuseppe, R., Leaf, R., Gorman, B., & Robin, M. W. (2017). The development of a measure of irrational/rational beliefs. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10942-017-0273-3.Google Scholar
  14. Dryden, W., & Branch, R. (2008). The fundamental of rational emotive behavior therapy. London: Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ellis, A. (1994). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy (2nd ed.). Secaucus, NJ: Birscj Lane.Google Scholar
  16. Ellis, A. (2003a). Differentiating preferential from exaggerated and musturbatory beliefs in rational emotive behavior therapy. In W. Dryden (Ed.), Rational emotive behavior therapy: Theoretical developments (pp. 22–34). New York: Brunner Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Ellis, A. (2003b). Discomfort anxiety: A new cognitive-behavioral construct (part I). Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 21(3–4), 183–191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ellis, A., & Dryden, W. (1997). The practice of rational emotive behavior therapy. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  19. Hayes, A. F. (2013). Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis. A regression-based approach. New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
  20. Hutchinson, G. T., Patock-Peckham, J. A., Cheong, J., & Nagoshi, C. T. (1998). Irrational beliefs and behavioral misregulation in the role of alcohol abuse among college students. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 16(1), 61–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hyland, P., Shevlin, M., & Adamson, G. (2014). The moderating role of irrational beliefs in the relationship between irrational beliefs and posttraumatic stress symptomology. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 42, 312–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Lovibond, P. F., & Lovibond, S. H. (1995). The structure of negative emotional states: Comparison of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) with the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33(3), 335–343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Mayhew, R., & Edelmann, R. J. (1989). Self-esteem, irrational beliefs and coping strategies in relation to eating problems in a non-clinical population. Personality and Individual Differences, 10(5), 581–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Mertler, C. A., & Reinhart, R. V. (2017). Advanced and multivariate statistical methods: Practical application and interpretation (6th ed.). Third Avenue, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  25. Oltean, H. R., Hyland, P., Vallières, F., & David, D. O. (2017). An empirical assessment of REBT models of psychopathology and psychological health in the prediction of anxiety and depression symptoms. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy.  https://doi.org/10.1017/S1352465817000133.Google Scholar
  26. Popov, B., & Popov, S. (2013). Adverse working conditions, job insecurity and occupational stress: The role of (ir) rational beliefs. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 31(1), 27–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Schnur, J. B., Montgomery, G. H., & David, D. (2010). Irrational and rational beliefs and physical health. In D. David, S. J. Lynn, & A. Ellis (Eds.), Rational and Irrational beliefs: Research, theory and clinical practice (pp. 253–264). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Scott, J. (2007). The effect of perfectionism and unconditional self-acceptance on depression. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 25(1), 35–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Szentagotai, A. (2006). Irrational beliefs, thought suppression and distress—A mediation analysis. Journal of Cognitive & Behavioral Psychotherapies, 6(2), 119–127.Google Scholar
  30. Szentagotai, A., & Jones, J. (2010). The behavioral consequences of irrational beliefs. In D. David, S. J. Lynn, & A. Ellis (Eds.), Rational and irrational beliefs: Research, theory and clinical practice (pp. 75–197). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Vîslă, A., Flückiger, C., Grosse Holtforth, M., & David, D. (2016). Irrational beliefs and psychological distress: A meta-analysis. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 85(1), 8–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Ziegler, D. J., & Leslie, Y. M. (2003). A test of the ABC model underlying rational emotive behavior therapy. Psychological Reports, 92(1), 235–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological Counseling and Guidance, Faculty of EducationPamukkale UniversityDenizliTurkey

Personalised recommendations