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Journal of Low Temperature Physics

, Volume 196, Issue 1–2, pp 170–176 | Cite as

Statistical Properties of Small Particle Trajectories in a Fully Developed Turbulent State in He-II

  • Wataru Kubo
  • Yoshiyuki TsujiEmail author
Article
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

Lagrangian trajectories of small particles in a fully developed turbulent state are studied in a rectangular duct. A plate heater is attached on the bottom to generate the thermal counter flow. The bath temperature is changed from 1.7 to 2.1 K and is controlled within 0.1 mK. Small particles made of solid hydrogen are visualized by high-speed camera, and their trajectories are recorded. Their motions indicate complex features depending not only on bath temperature and heater power, but also on particle size. In this study, the Hurst exponent is defined by \(|\mathbf x (t+\tau )-\mathbf x (t)| \propto \tau ^H\), where \(\mathbf x (t)\) denotes the particle position at time t. It was found that there is a characteristic timescale \(\tau _0\). For small time separation, \(\tau \le \tau _0\), the exponent H is small. However, for large time separation, \(\tau _0 \ll \tau \), H is nearly 1.

Keywords

Lagrangian velocity Particle size PTV measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Financial support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science 15H03917 and Challenging Exploratory Research 16K14158 are gratefully acknowledged. The experimental support by Mr. Akira Hirano, Mr. Daiki Kato and Kouhei Oodaka was indispensable in our measurements.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Energy Engineering and ScienceNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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