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Journal of Community Health

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 20–29 | Cite as

Examining Breast Cancer Screening Behavior Among Southern Black Women After the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force Mammography Guideline Revisions

  • Deeonna E. FarrEmail author
  • Heather M. Brandt
  • Swann Arp Adams
  • Venice E. Haynes
  • Andrea S. Gibson
  • Dawnyéa D. Jackson
  • Kimberly C. Rawlinson
  • John R. Ureda
  • James R. Hébert
Original Paper
  • 124 Downloads

Abstract

Updated United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and American Cancer Society mammography screening recommendations push for increased age of initiation and lengthened breast cancer screening intervals. These changes have implications for the reduction of breast cancer mortality in Black women. The purpose of this study was to examine breast cancer screening behavior in a cohort of Southern Black women after the release of the 2009 USPSTF recommendations. Surveys assessing cancer screening information were collected from members of Black churches between 2006 and 2013. The sample was restricted to women aged 40 to 74 years, who did not report a breast cancer diagnosis, or a recent diagnostic mammogram (n = 789). Percentages of women ever completing a mammogram (age 40–49) and annual mammography (age 50–74) in 2006–2009 and 2010–2013 were compared using chi-square statistics. Logistic regression models were fit to determine the predictors of adherence to pre-2010 screening guidelines. No significant changes in mammography rates were found for women in the 40–49 age group (X2 = 0.42, p = 0.52) nor for those in the 50–74 age group (X2 = 0.67, p = 0.41). Completing an annual clinical breast exam was a significant predictor of adherence to pre-2010 screening guidelines for both age groups (OR 19.86 and OR 33.27 respectively) and participation in education sessions (OR 4.26). Stability in mammography behavior may be a result of PCP’s advice, or community activities grounded pre-2010 screening recommendations. More research is needed to understand how clinical interactions and community-based efforts shape Black women’s screening knowledge and practices.

Keywords

Early detection of cancer Guideline adherence Mammography African Americans Breast neoplasms 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Deloris Williams RN, BSN, MSN, PhD, Wanda Green, and the regional coordinators of the State Baptist Young Woman’s Auxiliary of the Women’s Baptist Educational and Missionary Convention of South Carolina and the participating churches for their work assisting with this study. DEF had full access to the data analyzed for this article and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Funding

This work was a part of the South Carolina Cancer Disparities Community Network (SCCDCN). The SCCDCN was supported by [Grant Nos. U01CA114601-05S2 (SCCDCN-1; 2005–2010); U54CA153461 (SCCDCN-II; 2010–2015); U54CA153461-04S2/ U54CA153461-05S1] from the Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities of the National Cancer Institute. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or the National Cancer Institute.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deeonna E. Farr
    • 1
    Email author
  • Heather M. Brandt
    • 2
  • Swann Arp Adams
    • 3
  • Venice E. Haynes
    • 2
  • Andrea S. Gibson
    • 4
  • Dawnyéa D. Jackson
    • 5
  • Kimberly C. Rawlinson
    • 6
  • John R. Ureda
    • 7
  • James R. Hébert
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Health Education and Promotion, College of Health and Human PerformanceEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of NursingUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.South Carolina Office of Rural HealthLexingtonUSA
  5. 5.Research DepartmentRescue | The Behavior Change AgencyWashingtonUSA
  6. 6.College of NursingUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  7. 7.Insights Consulting, IncColumbiaUSA
  8. 8.South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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