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Concordance in the Reporting of Intimate Partner Violence among Male-Male Couples

  • Rob StephensonEmail author
  • A. Sharma
  • M. J. Mimiaga
  • R. Garofalo
  • E. Brown
  • A. Bratcher
  • T. Wimbly
  • M. A. Hidalgo
  • S. Hoehnle
  • J. Thai
  • P. S. Sullivan
  • N. A. Suarez
Original Article

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) among male couples is increasingly recognized as a public health concern. Research on IPV in opposite sex couples indicates frequent underreporting of IPV and high levels of discordance in reporting among dyads. Concordance studies inform refinement methods to measure the experience of IPV among dyads; however the lack of dyadic studies of male couples impedes our understanding of the extent to which IPV is differentially reported in male-male dyads. This study utilized baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of a behavioral intervention to optimize antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among 160 sero-discordant male couples in three US cities and provides the first analysis of concordance in reporting IPV among male couples. Low degrees of concordance in the reporting of IPV were identified among male dyads, with a greater proportion of men reporting violence perpetration than experiencing violence. The greater reporting of IPV perpetration may be linked to adherence to concepts of masculinity. The results underscore the unique experiences of IPV among male couples and the need to reexamine current IPV measurement and intervention strategies.

Keywords

Intimate partner violence Men who have sex with men Concordance Dyadic 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob Stephenson
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • A. Sharma
    • 2
  • M. J. Mimiaga
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • R. Garofalo
    • 7
    • 8
  • E. Brown
    • 6
  • A. Bratcher
    • 9
  • T. Wimbly
    • 9
  • M. A. Hidalgo
    • 10
    • 11
  • S. Hoehnle
    • 7
    • 8
  • J. Thai
    • 8
  • P. S. Sullivan
    • 9
  • N. A. Suarez
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, School of NursingUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.The Center for Sexuality and Health DisparitiesUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Center for Health Equity ResearchBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Departments of Behavioral and Social Health Sciences and EpidemiologyBrown University School of Public HealthProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical SchoolBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.The Fenway InstituteFenway HealthBostonUSA
  7. 7.Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Department of PediatricsNorthwestern University, Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  9. 9.Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public HealthEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  10. 10.Center for Trans Youth Health and DevelopmentChildren’s Hospital Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  11. 11.Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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