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Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 33, Issue 8, pp 507–513 | Cite as

Doing Equitable Work in Inequitable Conditions: an Introduction to a Special Issue on Transformative Research Methods in Gender-Based Violence

  • Nkiru Nnawulezi
  • Carrie Lippy
  • Josephine Serrata
  • Rebecca Rodriguez
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of this special issue is to explore how researchers, evaluators, and practitioners use community-based, participatory research (CBPR) approaches to prevent gender-based violence, support survivors, and transform communities and systems. In this introduction, the editors define gender-based violence (GBV) and briefly discuss how systemic inequities exacerbate the prevalence of GBV. The authors featured in this special issue aim to dismantle these inequities by engaging in research approaches that center those who are most impacted by the social issue, ensure that community members guide the research process, build community capacity, and aim to transform oppressive conditions. The issue includes six empirical studies across the United States that cover the process and outcomes of conducting transformative CBPR. It also contains six commentaries from GBV adult practitioners and young people who provide pertinent insights on their experiences working with academic researchers and/or engaging in participatory research. The articles in this special issue cover the major themes of defining community, working in inequitable conditions, and transforming individuals and communities.

Keywords

Community-based participatory research Gender-based violence Transformation Oppression Liberation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We deeply appreciate the authors who participated in this special issue. We especially want to thank Dr. Rebecca Macy for her support and guidance throughout the editorial process, and for her thoughtful review of this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018
corrected publication September/2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.The Northwest Network of Bi, Trans, Lesbian, and Gay Survivors of AbuseSeattleUSA
  3. 3.National Latino Network for Healthy Families and Communities, Casa De EsperanzaSt. PaulUSA

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